The Art of Books

York’s newest downtown mural made a fairly quiet appearance last week (Sunday, August 23 to be exact) in the WeCo section of West Market Street. Informally entitled The Art of Books, the 16’ x 8’ piece of original art now graces the side of The York Emporium, and is visible as you travel down West Market Street heading into the Square.

As luck would have it, Randy Flaum, the “York Story Man” happened by during the installation, and created the story:

https://yorkstoryman.wordpress.com/2015/08/24/wall-mural-highlights-the-art-of-books/

 

The Art of Books
The Art of Books

We had commissioned Hanover artist Christopher Barr to paint the work several months ago, and working in his garage/studio during the summer heat, he completed it; right on time, too, so it could be installed just prior to last weekend’s Pennsylvania Cigar Box Guitar Festival.

Chris and I worked together on the general concept, but he did all the heavy lifting on the piece. The idea was to show a cross section of popular works in one motif. And a number of books are represented:
• The works of 1930s horror writer H.P. Lovecraft
Don Quixote de la Mancha by Miguel de Cervantes
• Herman Melville’s Moby Dick
• The emerald city of Oz {including Dorothy’s house atop
a cyclone)
The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
• Anthony Burgess’ A Clockwork Orange
• J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit004
• Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse Five

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• Harry Potter going after the snitch005
• Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

• George Orwell’s  1984                                                                                                           
The Raven by Edgar Allen Poe
• Stephen King’s Dark Tower

• Douglas Adams’ The Hitchhikers’ Guide to the Galaxy

Watership Down by Richard Adams
along with a few other things (a dragon, the Death Star of Star Wars fame, a sea serpent, a civil war soldier, and a flying saucer…just because).

Chris worked in oil-on-plywood and put a clear coat over the finished mural to protect it from the elements.

Will it last 1,000 years? Probably not. But we consider it contemporary public art.

Enjoy!