Category Archives: advice

Twitter Talk

At DreamWrights, you know me as Michelle Denise Norton, Founder and Director of Theatre Under The Trees, apprentice costumer and yawner through 8 am meetings. On Twitter, I am @mdnightmaverick, insomniac, enthusiast, conversationalist, In the Bleak December author, artist, animator, camera ace, director of Shakespeare (+ shorts), @blinkkittylove, etc.. Twitter has enabled me to collaborate with people across the country, make friends internationally and have a community of support I might otherwise be lacking as a freelance writer, artist and theatre professional.  I have heard people express puzzlement and dismay over social media, but it can be a valuable tool to have available.

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The first thing to remember is that Twitter, where I spend most of my internet time so my focus will be there, is talk.  #justtalk if you want a hashtag. It is you interacting with other people, in shorter snippets perhaps than if you were interacting over tea in the same room, but it is still conversation. The rules of common courtesy still apply. Trusting your instincts is still essential.  But so is having some fun and finding like minded spirits who may inspire you.

People may try to sell you industry jargon and there are those using social media who are more corporate bot than individual, but the people you want to connect to are the ones who will talk to you.  Because whether you meet someone in person or on line, it’s talking and shared experience that create a connection and those connections can be a strong part of your network as an artist.

I have gotten paid jobs via Twitter.  I follow theatres, actors and directors in places other than America.  I read reviews of shows being done in places like China and add that to my general theatre knowledge and inspiration pool. I am currently researching the all female Takarazuka Revue in Japan to add some texture to how I approach Rosalind in As You Like It this summer. I share the things that I find interesting and enjoy when others do as well.  When I have a free Thursday afternoon, I participate in the HowlRound* weekly moderated Twitter discussion.

So, here are my guidelines:

  1. Stay Safe. If someone makes you uncomfortable, block them. Immediately.
  1. #hashtag. They’re fun.  Every show I direct, I create a specific hashtag so people can follow the progress on Twitter or my blog.  It started with Merchant of Venice aka #merven.  For As You Like It, I’ll probably stick with the short and simple #ayli.  My favorite so far was #EPHvSYR, which represented our soccer mad take on Comedy of Errors.  It’s a good way to organize thoughts.  It’s also a good way to find people to follow.  I sometimes read through #theatre or #Shakespeare posts to see if anything interests me.
  1. Don’t just promote your projects. Interact. Retweet someone else’s project every once in awhile.  Share things about what you’re doing, watching, reading…yes, even eating.  Behave like yourself while remembering that Twitter especially is a public forum.Don’t be afraid to talk to people — or ask for help.  I read somewhere that Twitter is like a party where you could walk up and talk to anyone. I think that’s a good analogy.
  2. Tempest Storm

    And if you’ve built a connection with someone, asking for help is the same as asking any other friend or colleague.  Part of why the dance in The Tempest worked so well was that I asked @KristynBurtt, a Los Angeles based entertainment reporter and dance aficionado for advice about choreographers who might work with a jazzy score.  She suggested Bill T. Jones and my research into his career and life gave me the vocabulary to have the conversations I needed with Kim Greenawalt, my choreographer — I’d kept in touch with her on Facebook after she performed as Hippolyta in A Midsummer Night’s Dream…double social media score.

2012 Mid Summers Night Dream
  1. Pictures boost interest.  Take a shot of rehearsal or the script you’re working on or a half built set.

Have fun. Be yourself.  Find organizations and people who interest you and follow them.  Talk.  Learn. Laugh.

*HowlRound is ‘a knowledge commons by and for the theatre community’ based at Emerson College in Boston.

Michelle Denise Norton, Creative Engine

Top 10 Things Most Often Heard Backstage

1. Can you get my ________ ?
This is mostly heard during tech rehearsals when we’re all trying to figure out the important stuff, like timing and how the show runs. But at one point or another, there’s something you’ll leave in the dressing room or green room.

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2. Put that back!!!
If you are part of the props crew you say this a lot. If you are backstage you hear it a lot. In fact, there are signs saying not to touch stuff! (They don’t always work.)

3. SSSSSSHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!
Even though it sounds like a geyser is going off back stage, this is used a lot. With kids, teens, young adults, and older adults not everyone knows the appropriate level of volume.

4. You need to move!
This also is heard mostly during tech rehearsals. People don’t always know where set pieces live backstage or realize that the costume that person is wearing will end up on that chair your sitting on in about 3 seconds.

5. You can’t sit there.
You might say this is a repeat because you have to tell different people that they can’t sit there every show.

6. Will you help me change?
Also heard during tech rehearsals when the actors are realizing how little time they actually have to switch from a fish to a Whoville character, for example. If you have a buddy to help get the zipper up or the hair in that wig cap, it make those changes go a lot faster.

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7.  I found this.
As a veteran crew member, I have been given all kinds of found treasures including staples, tape, bobby pins, safety pins, plastic things, birthday candles, batteries, parts of costumes, parts of props, and parts of the set! The fun of theatre!

8. What is this?
Even though this prop has been sitting on the props table for six weeks, it never fails that during the most quiet scene in the show, you hear someone ask someone to explain what it is.

9. Where’s the director?
Everyone always has questions for the director. But for some reason, the middle of show is the best time to ask.

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10. It’s dark.
Yes, back stage is dark. Thanks for letting me, the whole cast, and the audience know!

Jacob Schlenker
Student
and Veteran DreamWrights Crew Volunteer

 

 

Top 10 Life Lessons You Learn As A Theatre Tech

1. Black is always chic. Although, I once dressed as a monk while a stagehand at DC’s Arena Stage.

2015-07 Bob McCleary

2. Patience is a virtue.  And waiting is an art.
3. Be clear when communicating with others.

In theater:
In is down, down is front
Out is up, up is back
Off is out, on is in
And of course,
Left is right and right is left

4. Treat everyone with respect, especially those lending a helping hand.
5. Always get a good night’s rest. There is nothing worse than waking up in the middle of a scene change and wondering, “Am I putting this on stage or taking it off!?”
6. Organization is the key to success.
7. Expect the unexpected.
8. Silence is Golden. The audience pays to hear the actors ON stage, not the gossip BACK stage!
9. You must be able to keep cool under pressure.
10. You are never alone…except maybe for one-man shows.  But this is ALWAYS true at DreamWrights.

Bob “T. Builder” McCleary
Technical Director, DreamWrights

Directors’ Advice: Audition Etiquette

With auditions for The Secret Garden just around the corner, DreamWrighters turned to our resident director as well as a few of our recent guest directors for some advice. Here is the second installment of wisdom and guidance on the topic of Audition Etiquette.

DreamWrighters: Thanks for taking a few moments to share your advice and experiences with our audience. Hopefully this advice will benefit new actors, experienced actors, as well as directors. As a director, Can you give us a few pointers on audition etiquette? What to do? What not to do?

Auditions

Paige Hoke: For me, the biggest “do’s” are being as nice, outgoing, confident, and prepared as possible. Act this way from the moment you enter the door to the moment you leave because directors and audition helpers do talk to each other and directors tend to be super observant. <wink>  Most directors look not only for talent, but for people they want to work with!

Also, make sure you say thank you after your audition! Always try to read the play or musical, or at least a synopsis, beforehand. This helps a lot if you are not given materials to use ahead of time. But if you are given materials beforehand, practice them a lot and be comfortable with them!

As far as don’ts…. don’t hide any conflicts you have, and don’t apologize or make excuses if you do mess up! Just keep going and recover from the mistake. :)

Rodd Robertson

Rodd Robertson: Have fun with it.  If you are nervous it will translate to the audition panel.  Someone who is having fun, is relaxed and handles any audition situation with poise will be remembered as someone with whom directors will want to work. Roll with the process.

Diane Crews: Dress comfortably and appropriately.  You need to be able to move freely.  No high heels, tight/short skirts/pants, not a lot of skin, and please don’t dress like the character you want to play.  The latter will usually be a negative for a director.  Casting is the director’s job! Be yourself … have energy … project … if asked to read different characters, make sure there is a difference.

Kirk Wisler: Be professional, listen to the panel, have your phone off, not doing this could really hurt you. Don’t give the audition panel any reason not to cast you. Have good eye contact with people in scene.

Michelle Denise Norton: Listen.  Be nice to other people.  Don’t be afraid to ask questions if you don’t understand.  Be yourself, which may seem counterintuitive but actually works.

About the Directors

Diane Crews: Artistic Director and Playwright-in-Residence at DreamWrights Youth & Family Theatre. Diane is currently directing The Best Christmas Pageant Ever. Having directed well over one hundred shows at DreamWrights, Pageant will be her last holiday production as she is set to retire in the Fall of 2016.

Paige Hoke: Paige Hoke is 2010 graduate of Arcadia University’s BFA in Acting Program. She has experience directing, teaching, and acting in the York and Philadelphia areas. She most recently directed Seussical at DreamWrights.

Michelle Denise Norton: Founder and Director of DreamWrights’ Theatre Under The Trees program.  Along with all of her theatrical endeavors, Michelle is also a writer, artist and cartoonist.  In Summer 2016, Theatre Under The Trees will be bringing As You Like It to local parks

Rodd Robertson: Director and actor, Rodd lists “Leo” from Leading Ladies and “Prof. Koknitz” from The Mouse That Roared as two favorite of his favorite roles.  He has directed a handful of productions including To See the Stars and Nancy Drew: Girl Detective at DreamWrights and elsewhere.

Kirk Wisler: Kirk made his directorial debut at DreamWrights this past summer, directing The Mouse that Roared. He has taken part in over thirty plays from 2001 until the present day. He hopes to continue directing and acting at DreamWrights for many more years to come.

The Magic of DreamWrights: A Testimonial

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About twelve years ago, my father took me to see a production of Cinderella at DreamWrights. I was a small, awkward child, I’ll admit, but after seeing the live performance with its hilarity, its sincerity, its magic, I was enraptured. I auditioned for The Best Christmas Pageant Ever and managed to land a role. Success! I was excited beyond belief. I, the reticent child, would be a part of a stage performance!

Over the years, I and my acting ability grew. Though I never landed a “lead role,” Diane’s wise words always clung to my skin: “There are no small parts, only small actors.” Everyone was important. Everyone played a role. Without each actor, the show would not be the same. It couldn’t be executed without everyone’s effort. Every performance was a collaborative effort, and the cast was more than a team of actors: it was a group of friends, a close-knit family.

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Under Diane’s warm and wise counsel, I never had a negative experience while within the walls of the old building. Though there were ghost stories about the building, and the rickety elevator was viewed as a death trap (which was problematic at times, as a group of young children, myself included, once got stuck on it), DreamWrights never disappointed me. I could live there, nestled in with the ball gowns and suits, the enormous puppets and the animal outfits.

Sydney Fuhrman

I have, unfortunately, not been able to participate in anything DreamWrights-related for the past year and a half due to my college endeavors, but I still hold DreamWrights in a very special place in my heart. I cherish my memories and my happiness that blossomed there, on-stage and behind the black curtains. I have played minor roles, like little Nancy in The Best Christmas Pageant Ever and I have played larger roles, like the Duchess in Alice in Wonderland. I have worked with props and I have worked as a stage manager. I have laughed backstage through tight lips and clasped fingers as the show carries on, and I have cried with people of all ages at the strike parties. I have nothing but fond thoughts of DreamWrights, and I deeply regret not participating in the theater as much as I could have in the past.

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DreamWrights, holder of my heart, nurturer of my strength, friend of my soul, you are a beacon. You foster hope, love, resilience, endurance, well-roundedness, but above all, you foster fun.

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Though I have not been involved in DreamWrights since Alice in Wonderland, I would like to thank everyone who has ever participated, who currently is participating, and who will ever participate in a DreamWrights production, be it on-stage, behind the scenes, out front, upstairs, or in the kitchen. Diane called DreamWrights a “big fun machine,” and as usual, I could never say it any better than that.

Keep thriving, DreamWrights. I hope to see you in action till the end of days.

Sydney Fuhrman

Directors’ Advice: Character Development

DreamWrighters recently caught up with our resident artistic director as well as a few recent guest directors for some advice. Here is the first installment of wisdom and guidance from these esteemed directors. Today’s question is on the topic of Character Development.

DreamWrighters: Thanks for taking a few moments to share your advice and experiences with our audience. Hopefully this advice will benefit new actors, experienced actors, as well as directors. As a director, how do you inspire and motivate an actor to embody his/her character?

Diane as a duck

Diane Crews: It is the actor’s job to find out as much as they can about their character.  The script offers a good deal of information via what you say, what other say about you, and to you. I often supply a character questionnaire, which encourages the actors to delve deeper and create some back story for their character as well.  They need to know how the character is different and the same as they are, and what they want and how they think.  I find asking questions that allow the actor to ‘think’ is the best and most helpful tool.

Paige Hoke: Think about what your character wants in a scene and in the overall show. Does it change? How does your character try to achieve their wants? Do they achieve what they want? What do other characters say about your character? What do you say about yourself? Who are your character’s friends, enemies, family members? How does your character feel about the other people in the world of the play/musical? Observe people in real life. See how they move and interact with each other.

Michelle Directing

Michelle Denise Norton: First, I start with a good script — that’s the foundation of everything. Then I tell actors: learn your lines.  Listen to the other characters on stage and what they are saying about your character.  Try to see the director’s overall vision and then find ways specific to your character that you can add depth to that vision.

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Rodd Robertson:  I ask the actors to think about whom their character is; how does he/she walk, talk, look? Then, I ask them to consider how they are portraying that character.  Is their portrayal a portrait of the actor’s mannerisms, speech patterns, or look?  If they’re just walking through a scene as themselves and aren’t trying to transform themselves into their character, I ask them to stop and change things.  If they can’t come up with anything, I’ll help them work it out.  I don’t want to see Johnny Depp up on that stage; I want to see Captain Jack.  And, I praise the heck out of them each step of the way during their transformation. Praise and encouragement is a powerful motivator.

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Kirk Wisler: Positive reinforcement. Build up your actors. For every negative give them two positives.  Keep open lines of communication.

 

 

About the Directors
Diane Crews: Artistic Director and Playwright-in-Residence at DreamWrights Youth & Family Theatre. Diane is currently directing The Best Christmas Pageant Ever. Having directed well over one hundred shows at DreamWrights, Pageant will be her last holiday production as she plans to retire in the Fall of 2016.

Paige Hoke: Paige Hoke is 2010 graduate of Arcadia University’s BFA in Acting Program. She has experience directing, teaching, and acting in the York and Philadelphia areas. She most recently directed Seussical at DreamWrights.

Michelle Denise Norton: Founder and Director of DreamWrights’ Theatre Under The Trees program.  Along with all of her theatrical endeavors, Michelle is also a writer, artist and cartoonist.  In Summer 2016, Theatre Under The Trees will be bringing As You Like It to local parks

Rodd Robertson: Director and actor, Rodd lists “Leo” from Leading Ladies and “Prof. Koknitz” from The Mouse That Roared as two of his favorite roles.  He has directed a handful of productions including To See the Stars and Nancy Drew: Girl Detective at DreamWrights and elsewhere.

Kirk Wisler: Kirk made his directorial debut at DreamWrights this past summer directing The Mouse that Roared. He has taken part in over thirty plays from 2001 until the present day. He hopes to continue directing and acting at DreamWrights for many more years to come.

If At First You Don’t Succeed: A Case Study

Hannah began taking camps and classes at DreamWrights at the age of 5. Theatre was in her blood, even at this young age. She could hardly wait until she was old enough to try out for a production. When she realized the first show she would be old enough to be in was Snow White, she was over the moon. It was one of her favorites and she knew she was destined to be in it. So, Hannah tried out and anxiously waited for “the call.” But when “the call” never came, the reality was devastating. She was not chosen to be in Snow White. Hannah was crushed.

Annie

But, young Hannah did something that is often hard even for adults to do. She pulled herself back up, set her sights on the next show, and tried out again. This time it was Annie and this time she made it. It was a great experience and Hannah confirmed her love for the theatre.

However, her story doesn’t end there. With one show under her belt, Hannah was ready for her next. It was another favorite, Beauty and the Beast. Again, the perfect moment. She was a shoe-in! But then she didn’t get in. And again, it was quite a blow for Hannah, especially since one of her best friends had made it. Maybe the next show, Sleepy Hollow? Didn’t work out. Or the next, Miracle on 34thStreet? Nope.

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During this time, Hannah’s mom continued to provide encouragement. She registered Hannah for production camps and theatre classes to keep her involved and doing what she loved while gaining experience. Although she surely had moments of doubt, young Hannah persevered and went for it again with Alice in Wonderland. She got in! In fact, then she had a good run of two more shows after Alice, Dr. Doolittle and The Hobbit.

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Through all of this, Hannah did what directors hope all unsuccessful auditionees will do. Remember what Guest Director Paige Hoke reminds us of in her recent blog? For the shows where Hannah wasn’t chosen, maybe she didn’t fit into the overall puzzle. But, she kept at it. She didn’t get resentful, she didn’t give up; she became determined and kept plugging along.

Certainly, Hannah’s experience  isn’t uncommon. The way she handled it, kept a positive attitude, and persevered could possibly be.  And what wonderful life lessons this young lady has already learned. Often, things don’t come easily to us in life.  Even before the age of 10, Hannah knew as well as anyone how to overcome, persevere, and believe in herself. The world is her oyster.

Auditions Ahead Beware …What You Say! Versus What is Heard!

Over the years I have heard the following statements said in a variety of ways:
1) There’s nothing for me in that show.
2) That’s a show for boys.
3) That’s a girls’ show.
4) That’s a children’s show.
The translation, to me, is you don’t know the story or DreamWrights or both.

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One of the first things you learn in college is to read the script, if you can, before you go to an audition. That is not always possible, but if it is an adaptation you can always read the story. Our next two shows are classics so they should be easy to find.The Best Christmas Pageant Ever is written by Barbara Robinson. It’s a wonderful book and the script is very close to the original. The Secret Garden, by Francis Hodgson Burnett is another easy to find story. Our script was adapted for the stage by Paige Hoke. I wrote Young King Arthur from a myriad of Arthurian legends so there is no one story to access, but scripts will be available to check out two weeks prior to auditions.

You may not know that DreamWrights has a play reading committee that works hard each year reading many scripts in the search of plays that best suit our theatre. Isn’t our theatre like all others? Not at all! First we are a Youth & Family Theatre. Children’s Theatre is theatre for children performed by adults. Youth theatre is theatre for all ages performed by young people. A youth & family theatre is for all ages performed by all ages.

Being a multigenerational theatre means we are always looking for shows that have legitimate parts for children, teens and adults. (A legitimate part means that each character has a name/lines/and is needed. Not just onstage to decorate the set.) Plus, we need large casts. Trust me, there are not that many good published scripts that fit into either, let alone both categories. So the committee has a daunting task! In addition, they are always striving for a balanced season, which is yet another challenge. Is there something to interest everyone both artists and audience? Is there variety in time periods, topics, genres, etc.?

Dreamwrights’ four main shows are different in yet another way. We double cast! Why? The reasons are many, but the main one is we always audition over one hundred and fifty hopefuls per show. A good audition in ‘regular’ (whatever that is) community based theatre is between thirty to fifty.

Now onto this boy girl thing. We would never select a script that didn’t have a fairly equal number of all ages and genders. You can not go by a title. Please see the breakdown below of our next three shows as a perfect example of what we always hope for.

Yes, there are always some characters that have more lines than others. But we are an ensemble (Webster: A group of complementary parts contributing to a single piece.) theatre. We work together to tell the story. And it’s not about the lines! It’s about the character, and how you bring it to life.

Now about this, ‘there’s no part for me’ business. You are doing two things wrong here with this line of thinking. First, you are limiting yourself incredibly. Second, you are doing the director’s job. If you can’t trust the director to cast you … don’t audition for them.

Best Christmas                  Secret Garden                  Young King Arthur

Women                             6                                            4                                                   7
Men                                    5                                            4                                                   7
Teen W                              0                                            6                                                   6
Teen M                              4                                             6                                                   7
Girls                                   7                                             6                                                   6
Boys                                  7                                              5                                                   5
Total                                 39                                            31 (Playing 47)                       38

Diane Crews
Artistic Director

Three Steps to Character Development

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Last fall, I had the privilege of playing Thorin in the musical production of The Hobbit. I loved this part, however it was quite challenging for multiple reasons. Namely, I was playing someone of a whole different gender, who was also much more stern and tough than I am. At first, I struggled. I thought he should be very forceful and commanding. But, he ended up seeming very angry and rude. I was asked to change this but it was a challenge to do so.

As I thought about how to best embody this character, I realized I had to become the character.  As weird as it sounds, I had to let Thorin take over my brain. The advice I would give to someone else struggling in a similar situation is to think like the character at all times. What would he do? How would he react? Even when off-stage, it is important to think about the life of the character. What is his backstory? What is he doing when he is not involved in an event on stage? Ask yourself these questions, and hopefully you will become your character on stage.

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So, in the case of my becoming Thorin, I proceeded by figuring out other details of his personality. He often got frustrated with the “imbeciles” in the company. I concluded from that side of him that he was easily irritable and liked everything a certain way. And, I understood his annoyance with Bilbo, because he was no help to this. Thorin was also very ambitious and frustrated with the dragon who took his land. With this, I was able to form a relatable character who was stern but not angry.

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That’s another challenge with character development. Words like stern and angry are often confused. You have to be positive that you aren’t letting other feelings take over a general quality. For example, a character who is commanding should not necessarily be overly forceful. The two qualities don’t automatically go together. As an actor, you could add opposite traits such as a humorous or relaxed tone (if it suits the character) to balance out the character so he or she does his job, while still being relatable.

In conclusion, here are three simple steps to character development:

  1. Consider “Who is this person?”

Come up with who the person is. What do they think of what is going on in the scene? How would they react? Then, how can the next line you carry deliver that feeling?

  1. Carry it Out

Use the tone you have already developed when delivering lines. But take note! Some scenes may require different tones. If necessary, refer back to step one.

  1. Remain in Motion

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Even if you don’t have a line, your expressions will take you to the next level. Play along with other characters’ lines. Think of your own in your head (but don’t say them). If you create a character that acts like someone (human or not) relatable by having clear facial expressions, you will boost your performance up to its best, a goal every actor wants to achieve.

Sophie Nicholson
Student

An Intro to Cosplay

T.W. Myers, Teaching Artist for DreamWrights’ Intro to Cosplay workshop, took a break from cosplaying and answered some of our questions about this wildly popular costumed role-playing pop culture phenomenon.

DreamWrighters (DW): What is cosplay?

T.W. Myers (TWM): Cosplay is a performance art in which participants (cosplayers) dress in costume and perform on stage in masquerades or away from the stage in live role-play as a specific character. These characters can come from many sources such as comic books, anime, manga, live-action movies, television shows and video games.

DW: What advice do you have for someone just getting started in cosplay?

TWM: When you’re just getting started in cosplay, don’t put so much pressure on yourself. Every cosplay you make doesn’t have to be perfect. If you’d rather buy a costume and add some homemade props instead of making your entire cosplay from scratch, go for it. The key is to be recognizable. And most importantly, have fun! The best part of cosplay is getting to share the fandoms you love with other fans.

DW: How does someone choose his/her character?

TWM: There are a lot of different reasons someone might choose their character. I usually choose a character because I feel some sort of deep personal connection to them, or because I simply find the character’s design to be very visually appealing. On occasion I’ve even chosen to cosplay a character because the costume itself presented some kind of interesting construction challenge that set it apart from simpler costumes.

DW: I have a character in mind but what should I do next?

TWM: Research. Once you’ve decided on a character you like, take some time to study their costume, props, makeup, mannerisms, and personality. Use a small notebook or media file to store reference pictures, notes, and ideas about what you’ll be making. It’s the little details that turn a good cosplay into a great one. And don’t forget about a budget. Decide how much you want to spend on a cosplay before you start to buy supplies, and stick with your budget. Even a small budget can go a long way with some creativity and planning.

DW: How do I connect with other cosplay-ers?

TWM: The best way to connect with other cosplayers is to start going to small local conventions. It’ll give you a pretty good sense of what the community is like without being overwhelming, and you’ll get to interact with other fans in person. Online cosplay and costuming community websites can also be a good way to connect with other cosplayers, share tips and tricks, and get valuable advice.

DW: What would you say to people who are hesitant to cosplay?

TWM: If you’re interested in cosplay but have been hanging back, please don’t! Come and cosplay with those of us who believe in the heart of the craft. True cosplay is about community, craftsmanship, self-expression, and the joy of sharing your passion for the characters and stories you love. It doesn’t matter how old you are, what race you happen to be, how tall or short you are, or what you weigh. If you’re enjoying yourself, you’re doing it right. Cosplay is for everybody!

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T.W. Myers has been cosplaying and costuming for 14 years. She offers freelance commissions of costumes, cosplay, and props from her small business Dancing Corpse Designs. Her customers have worn these costumes for events all across the country, from L.A. to New York City. Myers has been head costumer on several stage productions and has worked at seasonal live horror venues, creating costumes and character makeups. She has been featured wearing her own personal cosplay costumes in several newspaper articles from different papers around the state. Myers’ signature (and favorite) cosplays are Harley Quinn from Batman, and Disney’s Maleficent.

DreamWrights’ Intro to Cosplay workshop will be held on October 10 from 10 – 11:30am. Translate the costume of an animated character into the real world. Learn the history while exploring how to choose and create a character that works well for you personally, practice speaking like your character, and investigate a variety of different character development techniques.  Ages 14+. Register online or by calling 848-8623. Come cosplay with us!