Big White Bear Finds Little White Fox


CHAPTER 14

When Omnok returned from hunting Big White Bear he sat down and began to think. “White bears about,” he thought to himself. “There must be white foxes about too, for they always stay close to white bears. I must go out and set some traps.” And that is just what he did the very next evening. He threw the cruel looking traps, with their ugly steel jaws, over his shoulder and went out to look for a good place to set them. At last he came to a place where there were many white bear tracks.

LITTLE WHITE FOX AND HIS ARCTIC FRIENDS

EDITOR’S NOTE

Welcome to the Junior Dispatch’s serialization of the 1916 book “Little White Fox and his Arctic Friends” by Roy J. Snell. This version includes all of the original illustrations as well as additional images from around the Internet.

At the end of this chapter is a vocabulary list, an essay question and a related video.

Junior Dispatch invites you to participate by commenting or e-mailing juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com with your thoughts on the chapter, vocabulary and essay responses or artwork.

By submitting a response, you earn a JD water bottle!

Learn more about the “Little White Fox” reading project here.

“I guess this will do,” he said to himself. He took out his great knife and cut out a cake of snow that was nearly as hard as ice. He cut this up into four little snow boards, very square and very smooth. Then he made a little hole in the snow and put a trap there. Next he made a thin shingle of snow,–so thin that the least touch would break it right in two. He put this over the trap and smoothed it over so carefully that no one in all the world could tell there was a trap hidden there.

Then he made a little house over it with the four boards,–a very fine looking house with a roof and three sides, and with one side left open for the door. He put some nice pieces of meat inside of the house, so when any little fox came to live there he wouldn’t have to go away hungry.

Finally he spilled a few drops of delicious smelling seal oil around the house and went away.

Now who should happen by that way, almost right away, but our own Little White Fox, looking, looking everywhere for Big White Bear. Right away the west wind blew a little whiff of the rich seal oil in front of his nose, and almost before he knew it, Little White Fox was standing in front of the little house that Omnok built, wondering how it came there and how there happened to be such delicious looking meat inside of it.

He wasn’t quite sure it was safe to go inside, so he just licked up all the drops of seal oil around the outside. It was very good, but it was only a taste, and it made him hungrier than ever.

“I just believe I am going to have that meat!” he said to himself. He was about to put his paw on the little snow shingle that was so thin and would break so easily, when he heard a great, gruff voice right behind him.

“Here! What you doing there?” Little White Fox just tumbled a back somersault away from the little house and ran as fast as ever he could, for there, right behind him, was Big White Bear! It’s one thing to be looking for some one very much larger than yourself, but quite another thing for that big person to be looking at you.

Little White Fox didn’t take any chances. But when he was a long distance away, and Big White Bear wasn’t following him, he turned around to see what would happen to the little house. He wished Big White Bear would go away, so he could get all that delicious meat.

But Big White Bear did not go away. He bent his long neck and put his great nose right up to the little house and gave a great “Woof!” The little house was far too small for Big White Bear to enter, so he put out one of his ponderous, powerful paws and sent the little house flying every way. But his ponderous, powerful paw went too deep. It touched the thin shingle, and Snap! the trap came down on Big White Bear’s paw. Came down hard too! Ow-e-e-e! How it did hurt! How Big White Bear roared! One might have thought he was being killed!

He ran limping to the ocean, dragging the little fox trap after him. When he got there, he stuck his paw up in the air, and moved it round and round, round and round, till the chain on the trap went Ziz! Ziz! Ziz! just like that. All of a sudden the trap came loose and tumbled into the sea, and I think Steadfast Starfish’s children are playing with it still.

Little White Fox ran straight home to tell his mother how he had found Big White Bear and all the things that had happened.

“Well,” said his mother, “I think Big White Bear has found you, and I am sure it is a good thing he did!” Then she sat down and told Little White Fox all about the dangers of nice smelling meat and the little houses that Omnok builds.

VOCABULARY

Look up and define these words:

  • Trap —
  • Shingle –
  • Steadfast -–
  • Ponderous -–

YOUR REACTIONS TO THE CHAPTER

In this chapter, Omnok the hunter sets a steel trap for an arctic fox by hiding it under the snow and ends up catching Big White Bear instead. Back in the early 1900s when “Little White Fox and His Arctic Friends” was written, trapping animals was fairly common. Now it’s not widely practiced because many people believe it’s a cruel form of hunting. Those that trap say it helps them get food to eat and fur to wear. What do you think? Is trapping necessary or is it cruel? Write down your thoughts or draw a picture about trapping. When you’re done e-mail it to us at juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com or mail it to us.

Our address is: Junior Dispatch, 205 North George St., York, Pa. 17401

YOUR VIDEOS FOR TODAY

Learn the trappers’ code of ethics: http://youtu.be/0iCCuvPXNXo

In this video, a barn owl is accidentally caught in a steel trap: http://youtu.be/70z_atDsqe4

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Big White Bear’s Kitchen


CHAPTER 13

“I mustn’t lose Big White Bear,” thought Little White Fox, “and I mustn’t let him see me. Oh! My! No! I mustn’t do that, for he is a big, big fellow and who knows what he might do to me?” So he slipped along behind very slyly, hiding behind this rock and that one, behind this snow pile and that one, very carefully indeed.

But Big White Bear was nearly as badly frightened as Little White Fox.

LITTLE WHITE FOX AND HIS ARCTIC FRIENDS

EDITOR’S NOTE

Welcome to the Junior Dispatch’s serialization of the 1916 book “Little White Fox and his Arctic Friends” by Roy J. Snell. This version includes all of the original illustrations as well as additional images from around the Internet.

At the end of this chapter is a vocabulary list, an essay question and a related video.

Junior Dispatch invites you to participate by commenting or e-mailing juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com with your thoughts on the chapter, vocabulary and essay responses or artwork.

By submitting a response, you earn a JD water bottle!

Learn more about the “Little White Fox” reading project here.

“What was that great big laugh?” he kept thinking to himself. And every time he thought of it, he looked behind him, and I am sure he really expected to see Omnok, the hunter, step right out with his terrible gun.

But by and by, when he had gone down the mountain and across the tundra and over the little lakes, he was not so much afraid, and he began to grow hungry.

Now that was just what Little White Fox hoped would happen, for he was very hungry himself and very curious besides to see where Big White Bear kept his pantry. Where would it be? Would it be in the tall mountains, or on the tundra, or out on the roof of the sea? How interesting it would be to know!

Pretty soon Big White Bear began to go straight ahead, without turning to one side or the other. Then Little White Fox was sure he had started for his kitchen, and he was glad as could be! Big White Bear went right out on the roof to the ocean and on and on and on, till Little White Fox was good and tired. When he came to the dark, dark waters of the ocean, Big White Bear didn’t stop one moment. He just tumbled right into the water and disappeared all at once!

“My!” said Little White Fox, opening his eyes very wide. “He will surely be drowned.”

And then all at once he thought of the fine dinner he had been expecting to get and how far it was back to the great rock where his mother was to wait for him. And then, of course, he remembered what his mother had said about coming back to call her. How sorry he was now that he had forgotten all about that. Oh! if they could only find Big White Bear’s kitchen! Just then Little White Fox heard a scratching on the ice and bounded behind an ice boulder before he was seen.

Big White Bear had come right up out of the ocean with the biggest dinner you have ever seen. His kitchen was right down in the water under the roof of the ocean, and he had brought his dinner out on the ice to eat it in the sunshine.

Little White Fox thought Big White Bear would never, never get through eating, but he finally did. And there was quite a big dinner left for Little White Fox. When Big White Bear was fast asleep on the ice, taking his after-dinner nap, Little White Fox crept up and began to eat his dinner too.

“He didn’t ask me,” said Little White Fox, “but then I didn’t give him a chance, I am sure he would if I had.”

It was a very good dinner and how Little White Fox’s sides did stick out when he had finished! But he didn’t stay to say thank you, so I guess he wasn’t very sure that Big White Bear would have invited him. He just hid behind an ice boulder and waited for Big White Bear to wake up. He mustn’t lose Big White Bear. He began to think about that fine dinner he had just eaten and about how he had found Big White Bear all by himself and how he had frightened him.

It made him feel so good he just wanted to laugh.

The more he thought, the more he wanted to laugh, and the first thing, before he knew it, he was laughing right out loud, “Ha! Ha! Yak! Yak! Yak! Yak!”

Just that minute Big White Bear woke up, and he didn’t stop to see who was laughing! He tumbled right into the ocean and went paddling away as fast as ever he could. He didn’t stop till he was almost out of sight, then he looked back once for just a moment and went paddling on and on, till he was way out of sight. Little White Fox had lost Big White Bear. All the fine dinners he was to have in the future were lost, just because he had laughed at the wrong time.

I don’t know what Little Mrs. White Fox had to say to him when he came home, for I wasn’t there, but there are some very fine switches made out of reindeer moss lying all over the tundra. However, Little White Fox was a very young fellow and had a great many things to learn, so perhaps his mother did not punish him very hard.

VOCABULARY

Look up and define these words:

  • Pantry —
  • Boulder –
  • Frighten -–
  • Chance -–

YOUR REACTIONS TO THE CHAPTER

In this chapter, Little White Fox does it again — sneaking into a place he wasn’t invited, which is very bad. Make up a list of rules that Little White Fox should follow and when you’re done e-mail it to us at juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com or mail it to us.

Our address is: Junior Dispatch, 205 North George St., York, Pa. 17401

YOUR VIDEOS FOR TODAY

An icy record — Swimming the North Pole: http://youtu.be/6sS8OcEwXNs


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Little White Fox Goes Hunting

CHAPTER 12

Little White Fox went hunting for Big White Bear! And he didn’t have a gun or a spear or a bow and arrow! Now what do you think of that! You see, it was this way. It was winter time, and food was becoming very scarce on the hills and the tundra. All the delicious roots were frozen hard in the earth, and the berries were all gone. Little White Fox was very hungry, and he told Little Mrs. White Fox about it.

LITTLE WHITE FOX AND HIS ARCTIC FRIENDS

EDITOR’S NOTE

Welcome to the Junior Dispatch’s serialization of the 1916 book “Little White Fox and his Arctic Friends” by Roy J. Snell. This version includes all of the original illustrations as well as additional images from around the Internet.

At the end of this chapter is a vocabulary list, an essay question and a related video.

Junior Dispatch invites you to participate by commenting or e-mailing juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com with your thoughts on the chapter, vocabulary and essay responses or artwork.

By submitting a response, you earn a JD water bottle!

Learn more about the “Little White Fox” reading project here.

“Well,” said his mother, “I guess we will have to go and find a Big White Bear.”

“Find a Big White Bear!” cried Little White Fox. “Why, he’d eat us!”

“But you mustn’t let him do that,” said Mrs. White Fox.

“But what do we want to find him for?” said Little White Fox, scratching his head.

“Listen,” said Mrs. White Fox very mysteriously. “Big White Bear is a very wasteful fellow. He has a big, big kitchen, and he has the greatest amount of food stored there. Oh! piles and piles of it! He doesn’t like to eat his food in his kitchen. He brings some out every day and always leaves plenty. Now, if we can find him, we will just follow him about until his dinner hour. When he is gone, we will have plenty to eat. See?”

Little White Fox did see and, though he was half afraid of Big White Bear, he was also very hungry, and so he was anxious to go on the hunt right away.

“You go one way, and I’ll go the other,” said Madam White Fox. “When you find Big White Bear, you come right back to this rock. I will come back too, and we will follow him about for weeks and weeks and have plenty to eat.”

Away went Little White Fox, looking, looking everywhere for Big White Bear! He looked behind the cliff on the mountain. But Big White Bear wasn’t there. He looked on the sand bars, but he wasn’t there. He went peering all around the little lakes, but he wasn’t there.

And where do you think Big White Bear was? He wasn’t in very good business, I assure you. He was over on the other side of the mountain.

Tusks the Walrus had just climbed out of the water and had gone to sleep on the beach close to the mountain. Tusks was a great, good-natured fellow, with a monstrous, heavy body and a pair of terrible looking tusks, which were not really terrible at all, for Tusks never used them except for digging clams. Big White Bear was up on the rocks, way, way above Tusks, and he had a great rock in his powerful paws, as big a rock as he could lift! He was going to throw it right down on Tusks and kill him. He had plenty to eat at home, but he thought this would be a fine chance to get some fresh meat.

Just when he was getting ready to throw it, something happened. Little White Fox came round the corner of the hill, looking here, there, and everywhere for Big White Bear. He came on round and round till he was just above Big White Bear, and then all at once he saw him! He was so glad he had found Big White Bear, that he stood right up on his two feet and gave one big, big laugh, “Ho! Ho! Ha! Ha! Yak! Yak! Yak!” just like that.

There was never a worse scared bear than Big White Bear in all the world! He had a guilty conscience, for he knew it was not right to throw a rock on poor, tired Tusks, and when he heard Little White Fox laugh, he didn’t know who it was. It might be some one very big and dangerous.

It might be Omnok, the hunter, with his terrible gun! Big White Bear just trembled and trembled, and the rock fell from his powerful paws and went splashing into the water without hurting Tusks at all. But when he looked around to see who had laughed at him, he couldn’t see any one at all.

Little White Fox knew a whole lot better than to let Big White Bear see him just then! But just after that Little White Fox did a very thoughtless thing. He was so hungry and wanted so much to see where Big White Bear had his kitchen, that he forgot all about his mother telling him to come back to the big rock, and away he went, after Big White Bear all by himself.

VOCABULARY

Look up and define these words:

  • Spear —
  • Monstrous –
  • Conscience -–
  • Clam -–

YOUR REACTIONS TO THE CHAPTER

In this chapter, we learn about one place where Little White Fox can get his food. Do you know where you get your food and how it gets to the store where you buy it? Ask an adult to tell you about how farms work and then drawing about where your food comes from! When you’re done e-mail it to us at juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com or mail it to us.

Our address is: Junior Dispatch, 205 North George St., York, Pa. 17401

YOUR VIDEOS FOR TODAY

A newborn walrus: http://youtu.be/lJGcrlHmsps

Felix the Cat is a matchmaker for walruses: http://youtu.be/f2vulByLOCM

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Big White Bear Meets Huskie


CHAPTER 11

“Now, I’ll tell you,” Omnok said to Huskie, “Big White Bear is a great big bully. He likes to fight all the little folks of the tundra and sea because he is so big. It would be a good thing if we could show him that he isn’t so awfully big, after all. Wouldn’t it?”

LITTLE WHITE FOX AND HIS ARCTIC FRIENDS

EDITOR’S NOTE

Welcome to the Junior Dispatch’s serialization of the 1916 book “Little White Fox and his Arctic Friends” by Roy J. Snell. This version includes all of the original illustrations as well as additional images from around the Internet.

At the end of this chapter is a vocabulary list, an essay question and a related video.

Junior Dispatch invites you to participate by commenting or e-mailing juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com with your thoughts on the chapter, vocabulary and essay responses or artwork.

By submitting a response, you earn a JD water bottle!

Learn more about the “Little White Fox” reading project here.

Ki, yi, yiyi,” said Huskie, which meant he thought it would.

“Well, then, this is what you must do. Go running about on the ocean ice everywhere and hunt for him. I will be hunting too. If you find him first, run away, then call me. I will shoot him. Do you see?”

Ki, yiyi,” answered Huskie again, meaning this time, “I do.”

Huskie ran up and down, in and out among the ice piles, until his feet were sore. He was very anxious to find Big White Bear. Whenever a little fellow has a chance to harm a big fellow he thinks is a bully, he always wants to do it. Did you ever notice that?

So Huskie ran on and on, even if his feet were sore.

“Hello!” He had just gone around something he thought was an ice pile when he heard a voice.

Looking up, he saw the face of Big White Bear. What he was going around wasn’t ice at all. It was Big White Bear. And, my! What a monster he was! Huskie had to look away off at Cape Prince of Wales Mountain and look again at Big White Bear before he could tell which was the larger, bear or mountain.

He wanted to run away. But Big White Bear was so very near he didn’t dare to, so he just said “Hello!” But to himself he said, “Big White Bear is a big, big bully, just as Omnok said. I am glad he is going to get killed.”

“Who are you?” asked Big White Bear.

“I’m Huskie, the Malemute dog. Who are you?”

“I am a Polar Bear. Where did you come from?”

“My home’s over there on the shore,” said Huskie, pointing his nose toward shore. “Where’d you come from?”

“I came from far, far North. I’ve never been here before. Didn’t mean to come this time. Last night I went to sleep on a corner of Old Ocean’s blanket. Old Ocean put up his knee in his sleep, and my corner of the blanket slid right down here. What do you think about that?”

“Very strange.”

Now Huskie is a great fighter himself, for a little fellow. And great fighters like fight stories. He was just itching to know all about Big White Bear’s big fights.

“Who’d you kill last?” he asked.

“Who did I kill?” said Big White Bear, opening his eyes very wide.

“Yes, was it a very bad fight?”

“A bad fight?”

"I am going to make your teeth chatter so you can't call your master."

“Yes, you don’t seem much scratched up for a great fighter. Look at me; one leg bent, nose split, and scarred up all over,” said Huskie proudly.

“Do you think I’m a great fighter?”

“Of course you are. Omnok says–” Huskie caught himself just in time. If Big White Bear knew all about Omnok, he’d run away.

“Why, I never fight anybody,” said Big White Bear gravely.

“Ha, ha, ha!” laughed Huskie. “That’s a good story. You never fight any one. What a fib!”

“It’s the truth.”

“The truth? Ha! Ha! Of course that’s not true. You’re a bear. All bears are fighters, and great big bullies, besides! Why! I bet you’ve got claws three inches long.”

“You think so?” Big White Bear put out his front paw which was as big as the trunk of a small tree. Huskie dodged.

“Look,” said Big White Bear.

Huskie looked at Big White Bear’s claws. They were not as long as his own. They were broad and blunt, just sharp enough for climbing over the ice.

“I don’t know why they name me Bear,” said Big White Bear; “Old Buster Grizzly, Buster Brown, and Buster Black, now, are very distant relatives of mine. Indeed, they have long claws and are great fighters. But my nearest relative, Tusks, the Walrus, is no fighter at all, and believe me, neither am I.”

But Huskie was a very quarrelsome and suspicious fellow.

“That will do to tell,” said he; “but I know it is not true. As for those claws of yours, I can guess how that is. They look very harmless now. But when you want to fight, you run them out like a cat’s.”

“It’s no such thing,” said Big White Bear.

“Oh, yes, it is. Omnok says it is. I am going to tell him now, and he’ll fix you!” Vain boast! Huskie had forgotten himself.

In another instant, before he could dodge, Big White Bear had grabbed him and hugged him tight. Huskie could not call out at all. His voice became the tiniest little squeak.

“Let me go! Let me go!” he squeaked. “I won’t tell! I won’t tell! Oh! Oh! Please, Mr. Bear, let me go!”

But Big White Bear only grinned, and said “Huh?”

“Oh, I’ll not kill you,” said Big White Bear finally. “It’s just as I have told you. I am no fighter. I never hurt anybody, unless I am driven to do so. I’ll not kill you, but I am going to make your teeth chatter so you can’t call your master.”

At that, Big White Bear dropped right down into the cold, cold water with Huskie in his arms.

Now Big White Bear lives half the time in water, and he does not mind it a bit. But poor Huskie! When Big White Bear put him back on the ice, he couldn’t have said a word to save his life.

“Now, go and tell your master that you have seen Big White Bear,” said Big White Bear, grinning. “But you don’t know where he is just now.”

Then he dropped into the water and disappeared.

Huskie did not wait to hunt up his master. He ran home as fast as he could go. Try as he might, Omnok has never been able to get him to go hunting for Big White Bear again.

VOCABULARY

Look up and define these words:

  • Bully —
  • Trunk –
  • Suspicious –
  • Vain –

YOUR REACTIONS TO THE CHAPTER

In this story, we hear the hunter calling the polar bear a bully, but in reality we see the polar bear isn’t much of a bully at all. Tell us what makes a person (or an animal) a bully? Write them down or make a drawing out of them! When you’re done e-mail it to us at juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com or mail it to us.

Our address is: Junior Dispatch, 205 North George St., York, Pa. 17401

YOUR VIDEOS FOR TODAY

A look back at childhood bullying: http://youtu.be/LwjJ4nYJKdc

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Fun for Two Little Bears

CHAPTER 10

Little White Bear and Little Black Bear met at the snow hill next day, but Little White Bear didn’t jump into Little Black Bear’s sharp claws, and you may be very, very sure they didn’t go exploring around Omnok’s house! They did go way, way out on the white roof of the ocean. There were splendid hills of ice to hide behind, and everywhere were great ice boulders over which they could play leap-frog.

Little White Bear had just started to leap over one fine, large boulder, and Little Black Bear was coming right after him, when all of a sudden Little White Bear turned a backward somersault and tumbled right into Little Black Bear.

LITTLE WHITE FOX AND HIS ARCTIC FRIENDS

EDITOR’S NOTE

Welcome to the Junior Dispatch’s serialization of the 1916 book “Little White Fox and his Arctic Friends” by Roy J. Snell. This version includes all of the original illustrations as well as additional images from around the Internet.

At the end of this chapter is a vocabulary list, an essay question and a related video.

Junior Dispatch invites you to participate by commenting or e-mailing juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com with your thoughts on the chapter, vocabulary and essay responses or artwork.

By submitting a response, you earn a JD water bottle!

Learn more about the “Little White Fox” reading project here.

“Wow!” howled Little Black Bear. “What’s the matter?”

“Shish!” whispered Little White Bear. “I saw something!”

“On the ice?” asked Little Black Bear, beginning to be frightened.

“Right out there a little bit farther,” whispered Little White Bear. “And it was the biggest thing! Oh! My! I can’t tell how big it was!”

Then Little Black Bear was frightened! What could it be, way out here on the ice, miles and miles from shore? Little White Bear hadn’t seen it move, but how could it get way out here if it weren’t alive? Trees and things like that couldn’t grow on the roof of the ocean.

Little White Bear goes swimming in the ocean, but Little Black Bear can't do the same. (LOREN SZTAJER PHOTO VIA FLICKR.COM)

They lay crouched down behind that big ice boulder until Little White Bear’s foot had gone to sleep, and Little Black Bear was catching cold from sitting on the ice.

“I am going to peek round and see if it has moved,” said Little White Bear bravely. He looked, and it hadn’t moved one little bit, so it seemed as if it couldn’t really be alive! Perhaps it was something that Omnok had left there. They crept up toward it, little by little, until they were right up to it, and what do you think? It was nothing but Omnok’s big whaling boat he had left on the ice.

They looked all around to see if Omnok were about, then they tumbled right into that boat for a frolic. There were a great many things in the boat, but the most interesting of all was a great, long “pooksack.” It wasn’t full of seal oil. If it had been, I am quite sure Little Black Bear would have had nothing to do with it. It was just full of air.

Omnok had used it for a sled when he drew his boat over the roof of the ocean. And what a splendid football it did make, and how they did knock it about! First Little White Bear would give it a boost with his big, clumsy paws, then Little Black Bear would boost it right over Little White Bear’s head! Then there would be a scramble to see who would get to it first. But one time Little Black Bear kicked it right over Little White Bear’s head so high that it tumbled off the roof of the ocean and down into the great dark sea. And Little White Bear tumbled right into the ocean after it! Yes, sir! Right into the water, and you never saw water so cold in all your life! Little White Bear didn’t scramble out as fast as ever he could! He just climbed up on that “pooksack”, happy as a clam, and wanted Little Black Bear to come in too!

Little Black Bear, however, had a notion that the water was cold, so he touched it with his toe and “Um-m-m! Um-m-m!” he didn’t want any swim that day. But Little White Bear wouldn’t come out of the water and play, so all Little Black Bear could do was to skip along home and tell his mother that he was quite sure that Little White Bear would freeze to death that very night.

“Oh, no!” said Madam Black Bear, looking very wise. “Little White Bear won’t freeze to death.”

“Why,” said Little Black Bear, opening his eyes wide, “I’m sure I’d freeze right away.”

“So you would,” said his mother. “You were a wise young fellow to try the water before you ventured in. But Little White Bear is quite different. He has a very warm coat and is very fat. He is used to the cold water and will live in it all winter. But just you wait,” she added, with a sly wink. “You will have a surprise for him some day! When he comes to look for you some cold, cold time, won’t he be surprised to find you snugly tucked away in bed and sleeping all day and all night? Won’t he, though?”

Madam Black Bear laughed a big bear laugh, and Little Black Bear laughed a little bear laugh, so together they were after all two of the happiest bears in all the world.

When Omnok went out on the roof of the sea to get his big boat, he saw what Little White Bear and Little Black Bear had done. He was very angry when he saw that his “pooksack” was gone. He thought Big White Bear had been there.

“I’ll go hunting for him to-morrow morning,” he said to himself. “And I’ll take Huskie, my Malemute dog, along!”

VOCABULARY

Look up and define these words:

  • Sharp —
  • Splendid –
  • Somersault –
  • Crouch –

YOUR REACTIONS TO THE CHAPTER

In this story, we learn the difference between polar bears and black bears — two animals that are very similar but very different. Do the same with two animals — compare what makes them the same and what makes them different. When you’re done e-mail it to us at juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com or mail it to us.

Our address is: Junior Dispatch, 205 North George St., York, Pa. 17401

YOUR VIDEOS FOR TODAY

A glimpse of life in the cold: http://youtu.be/bG9FAo7mjoU

Want to know the difference between the North and South Poles? http://youtu.be/QF01mBSB8rY

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Little Black Bear’s Discovery

CHAPTER 9

What was Little Black Bear doing all the time Little White Bear was down in Omnok’s house, and what about Omnok’s “pooksack”?

Well, Little Black Bear looked down into Omnok’s house and wished his little playmate would hurry out, so they could discover some more things. But when he had waited what seemed a long, long time, he went on a little exploring trip all by himself. And he discovered something right away. It had four legs like Tdariuk, the reindeer. But it was ever so much larger than Tdariuk, and its legs were straighter. Little Black Bear wasn’t long in finding out that this was not really any one at all, but just a rack Omnok had made on which to keep his meat.

LITTLE WHITE FOX AND HIS ARCTIC FRIENDS

EDITOR’S NOTE

Welcome to the Junior Dispatch’s serialization of the 1916 book “Little White Fox and his Arctic Friends” by Roy J. Snell. This version includes all of the original illustrations as well as additional images from around the Internet.

At the end of this chapter is a vocabulary list, an essay question and a related video.

Junior Dispatch invites you to participate by commenting or e-mailing juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com with your thoughts on the chapter, vocabulary and essay responses or artwork.

By submitting a response, you earn a JD water bottle!

Learn more about the “Little White Fox” reading project here.

And there was meat up there! Oh! strips and strips of it!

But it was all high out of reach. Little Black Bear sniffed and sniffed, and My! It did smell good!

But even when he stood on his tiptoes he couldn’t reach the least little mouthful. There was one thing closer to the ground.

And such a strange thing as it was!

It looked like a coat that had belonged to one of Little Brown Seal’s cousins, but he couldn’t be in the coat right then, for the collar was tied up tight as could be, and so were the sleeves.

“If there was any one in that coat, he would smother right away,” said Little Black Bear, scratching his head. “But there is something in it! See how its sides bulge out! I’ll just give it a good poke and see what happens.”

Now that strange thing was just hung up by one string, and it swung about very easily. When Little Black Bear gave it a great poke, it went up in the air quickly! It came down quickly too, and it hit Little Black Bear square on his nose. He spun about and tumbled down in the snow, and at first he had a notion to be angry. When the thing had stopped swinging, he stood on his tiptoes and smelled of it.

“E-ee-ee! How good it smells,” he cried. “I just believe that is Omnok’s ‘pooksack’ of seal oil which mother has been talking about!”

Little Black Bear’s mouth began to water and water, for his mother had told him there was nothing half so good in the world as fine, rich seal oil.

Now how was Little Black Bear going to get that oil out of that “pooksack”? He thought and thought and thought. At last he remembered the sleeves which were tied up. They were tied way down at the ends, and there must be seal oil right down to the very tips. His mouth was too small to bite the “pooksack”, but one of these sleeves, — that was the very thing! He would bite one of those, hard! with his sharp teeth, and the oil would come right out into his mouth!

He had to stand on his tiptoes to reach, but at last he set his teeth hard and Ah-ne-ca! How good that seal oil did taste! It went gurgle, gurgle, right down his throat so fast he could hardly get time to swallow.

But very soon he began to feel as if he had had quite enough. How was he going to stop the seal oil from coming out? Well, he couldn’t do that. He would just have to open his mouth and dodge right out of the way quick.

“That will be easy,” he thought to himself. Anyway, he took two or three more swallows, then he opened his mouth wide, and Ah-ne-ca! before he could move one bit, that seal oil shot him right in the eyes and ears and began to run down his back so fast he couldn’t even give one grunt.

You should have seen that little bear! He was oil from head to foot! And as for his fine, silky, glossy, black coat, he was just sure it was ruined! He didn’t stop a minute to see if Little White Bear was out of Omnok’s house, but ran home as fast as ever he could.

“Why! Why!” cried his mother, as he came into the house. “Where have you been?”

Little Black Bear couldn’t say a word. He just crawled over in one corner and looked down at his toes.

And was his coat really ruined? Ask puss if her coat is ruined some day when she comes in out of the rain, and see what she will say.

Mother Black Bear cleaned that coat up that very night so it looked better then new, but how she did it I wouldn’t pretend to say.

VOCABULARY

Look up and define these words:

  • Tiptoes —
  • Gurgle –
  • Seal (animal) –
  • Sleeves –

YOUR REACTIONS TO THE CHAPTER

In this story, Little Black Bear gets really messy. Tell us a story about a time that you got really messy. Maybe you were painting, cooking or playing outside when it happened. Leave a comment, write us a story or or draw us picture. When you’re done e-mail it to us at juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com or mail it to us.

Our address is: Junior Dispatch, 205 North George St., York, Pa. 17401

YOUR VIDEO FOR TODAY

Did you know bears like to play? Just don’t try playing with them! http://youtu.be/Qak_CJMQcf0

 

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Trouble for Little White Bear


CHAPTER 8

“Come on,” cried Little White Bear, almost standing on his head in his eagerness to be at play with this new friend.

LITTLE WHITE FOX AND HIS ARCTIC FRIENDS

EDITOR’S NOTE

Welcome to the Junior Dispatch’s serialization of the 1916 book “Little White Fox and his Arctic Friends” by Roy J. Snell. This version includes all of the original illustrations as well as additional images from around the Internet.

At the end of this chapter is a vocabulary list, an essay question and a related video.

Junior Dispatch invites you to participate by commenting or e-mailing juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com with your thoughts on the chapter, vocabulary and essay responses or artwork.

By submitting a response, you earn a JD water bottle!

Learn more about the “Little White Fox” reading project here.

“Let’s go exploring,” said Little Black Bear. “That’s the most fun of all!”

“All right,” shouted Little White Bear, turning a handspring. And away they went, — two little bears out to see what they could find in the great, white world.

They went down by the lakes and saw where Wigeon had made her nests in the warm summer time; they wandered over the hills and said “Woof Woof!” in the doorway to Little Mrs. White Fox’s home; they went here and there, but at last they came upon something really very strange.

“What can it be?” said Little White Bear, standing on one foot and looking very wise.

“What can it be!” said Little Black Bear, scratching his head. And what indeed could it be? It was right down at the foot of the mountain. There was a big, black, square thing right in the snow, and in the middle of that there was another little square that was brown. Did any one in the wide world ever hear of finding such a strange thing in a great white wilderness? There wasn’t a square thing anywhere else on the whole tundra. Things were round and crooked and made of little angles, but who ever saw a square thing in real tundra land?

The two little Bears walked round and round it and tried to think what it could be. At last Little Black Bear put one foot on it very timidly. “There!” he said bravely, “I stepped on it! Do you dare?”

“Of course I do!” said Little White Bear, walking right out on the big square. “See me!” he shouted and went racing right across the thing. That is, he started across, but just when he was on the little brown square, he felt his feet begin to sink. There was a rip–ripping of something, and down he went, till he struck kerwhack! on something far below. He jumped to his feet very quickly. Where was he?

There were brown walls all about him, like the walls of the cave where his home was. And look as he might, Little White Bear could see no way to get out except to climb back up through the hole he had made when he fell in. And that was far, far above his head. He could never get out that way. And what was worst of all, as he began to look around, he was more and more sure of one dreadful thing. And that was that he was in the house of Omnok the hunter.

My! That was a terrible thought. But it was true! They had been playing on Omnok’s roof, and Little White Bear had fallen right through the window in the roof. Omnok had made a curtain out of the coats of many eider ducks, and this was the brown square that Little White Bear had started to run across.

Well, there wasn’t a thing he could do. He just wandered round and round, but he couldn’t find the least little place where he could get out. “What a strange place to live!” he thought to himself. “How does he ever get into it himself?”

But Little White Bear wasn’t the least bit doubtful that Omnok would be able to get into his house when he came home. And you may be very sure he wasn’t a bit happy. He just went way over in the corner under Omnok’s bed and sucked his thumb while he wished he was at home in his own dear cave.

All of a sudden he heard a noise. Omnok was coming! Little White Bear heard his voice, very big and very angry, outside! “Who has stolen my ‘pooksack’?” Omnok growled. “Who has broken my window?”

How poor Little White Bear trembled. He crouched down under the bed just as far as he could. Now he could hear Omnok come closer to his house. And then he saw Omnok’s face at the side of the wall. Ah! Yes! There was a little curtain there! Why had he not seen it! But suddenly a happy thought came to Little White Bear. Just when Omnok was standing up, with his terrible gun in his hand, Little White Bear rushed right at him and tumbled against his feet so hard that Omnok went sprawling to the floor, and his terrible gun went clattering after.

Little White Bear bounded out of the little door. But there was just a little alley and then another room with a window high up in the wall. He looked quickly, and saw a little shelf, like Omnok’s bed, only higher up, right under the window! Little White Bear jumped up but tumbled back. He tried it again and fell back. But the third time he found himself on the shelf, and in another minute he was out in the fine old world, running as fast as ever he could for home. And you may be very sure he was glad to be with his mother safe in their cave that night.

VOCABULARY

Look up and define these words:

  • Wigeon –
  • Clatter –
  • Square –
  • Angles –

YOUR REACTIONS TO THE CHAPTER

In this story, Little White Bear finds himself trapped in the home of a human. What would you do if you were small enough to be trapped in the home of an animal, such a beehive, a rabbit hole, a squirrel’s tree hollow or even a dragon’s den? What would you do? What kind of strange things would see? Leave a comment, write us a story or or draw us picture. When you’re done e-mail it to us at juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com or mail it to us.

Our address is: Junior Dispatch, 205 North George St., York, Pa. 17401

YOUR VIDEO FOR TODAY

Here’s an interesting video of a bear’s visit to a house … and all of its garbage cans: http://youtu.be/qiFSSnFA13Y

Now check out what happens when a raccoon invades a house: http://youtu.be/AUVq0JoyGME

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Little White Bear and Little Black Bear


CHAPTER 7

Little White Bear stepped out from behind a great boulder that was black as black could be against the whitest of all white worlds. And my! It was a lonesome world! His mother had left him alone, years and years ago. It seemed to him it was time to find something to eat. At last he was so lonesome he just had to get out into the sunshine and see if there was any one in all the wide, white world who would play with a little white bear.

LITTLE WHITE FOX AND HIS ARCTIC FRIENDS

EDITOR’S NOTE

Welcome to the Junior Dispatch’s serialization of the 1916 book “Little White Fox and his Arctic Friends” by Roy J. Snell. This version includes all of the original illustrations as well as additional images from around the Internet.

At the end of this chapter is a vocabulary list, an essay question and a related video.

Junior Dispatch invites you to participate by commenting or e-mailing juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com with your thoughts on the chapter, vocabulary and essay responses or artwork.

By submitting a response, you earn a JD water bottle!

Check out the “Little White Fox” story hub here.

“I wonder! I do wonder if there is any one!” he said to himself.

“Chee! Chee!” said a very small voice right close to him. He looked and looked, and at last he spied Little Snow Bunting balancing herself on a salmon-berry bush.

“What does she mean by that?” thought Little White Bear. “Does she want to play with me?” But when he came closer to her, she said “Chee! Chee!” so loudly and saucily he felt almost sure she didn’t, and when she spread her snowy wings and flew far, far away, he was quite sure she didn’t.

“My! What a world!” said Little White Bear. “I wonder–” But just then he heard a strange sound,--crack–crack–crackety, crackety, crack!

What could it be? In just a moment Tdariuk, the reindeer, came trotting around the point, and Little White Bear knew it was Tdariuk’s heels he had heard cracking. But Tdariuk didn’t give him time to say a word. He just caught one whiff of bear smell, and away he went faster than ever,--crack–crack–crackety, crackety, crackety! Crack! Crack!

Down by the ocean things were no better. When Little Brown Seal saw him coming, he tumbled right into the ocean without so much as saying “How do you do.”

Little White Bear looked this way and that, and suddenly he spied some little black things going up and down, up and down, over a little snow hill. Sometimes there were four, sometimes three, sometimes two, and sometimes none at all.

“Must be Jim Raven and his crowd,” said Little White Bear. “Well, they won’t get away from me! I’ll just slip up to that little hill and then jump right over it so quick they won’t have time to fly away!”

He slipped up very quietly, Oh! just as quietly as any little bear could. He crept round this little hill and that little salmon-berry bush until he was right under the snow hill.

“Now,” he said to himself, “Now’s the time!”

Little White Bear knew right away what he had done.

He couldn’t see the black things going up and down, but he knew they were there, so he gave one big, big spring and then, “Oh! Oh! Ow! Wow! E-e-e! Let me go!” he cried, and bounded away as fast as he could.

What could have scratched him so? Where had Jim Raven and his crowd gone? Pretty soon he looked around, and right there in the snow where he had jumped was a little bear just about his own size and a great deal like him, but black as black could be!

“What’d you jump on my stomach for?” said the stranger. Then Little White Bear knew right away what he had done. The black things he thought were Jim Raven and his crowd were not those people at all, but they were Little Black Bear’s feet sticking up over the hill, as he rolled around on the snow, having a frolic all by himself.

“Well,” said Little White Bear, “where did you come from?”

“Oh! My home is just a little way up in the hills,” said Little Black Bear politely. “We have a great many cousins in this cold country; there is Little Brown Bear and Big Barren Ground Grizzly Bear, and I don’t know how many more, but we seldom get to see any of our white cousins. How are you? I am glad to see you.”

“I think I shall be very fine when I get over my scratches,” smiled Little White Bear. “You must have very sharp claws.”

“They are quite sharp,” said Little Black Bear slowly. “I am sorry I scratched you. Let’s find something to play, and you will forget all about it.”

“All right!” said Little White Bear gleefully, and away they went, looking for some adventure in the great, white world.

VOCABULARY

Look up and define these words:

  • Bunting  –
  • Balancing –
  • Spring (verb) –
  • Seldom –

YOUR REACTIONS TO THE CHAPTER

In this story, Little White Bear looks for something fun to do in the arctic wilderness. What sort of things do you like to do when you are outside in the winter time? Write us a story about it or draw us a picture. When you’re done e-mail it to us at juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com or mail it to us.

Our address is: Junior Dispatch, 205 North George St., York, Pa. 17401

 

YOUR VIDEO FOR TODAY

While it’s hard to find a video of polar bears hanging out with brown or grizzly bears, check out this video of polar bears and huskies: http://youtu.be/JE-Nyt4Bmi8

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Little White Fox Helps Himself


CHAPTER 6

Little White Fox was hungry again, and it was the hard, cold, winter time, when all of the little folks of the tundra have to hunt far and wide for food. He had asked Tdariuk, the reindeer, to invite him out to dinner. Tdariuk was very nice about it, but said he had only some lichens, which men call reindeer moss, to eat. When Little White Fox tasted them, he said they were not one bit good. The truth is they are very bitter, and taste good only to Reindeer and Caribou folks.

LITTLE WHITE FOX AND HIS ARCTIC FRIENDS

EDITOR’S NOTE

Welcome to the Junior Dispatch’s serialization of the 1916 book “Little White Fox and his Arctic Friends” by Roy J. Snell. This version includes all of the original illustrations as well as additional images from around the Internet.

At the end of this chapter is a vocabulary list, an essay question and a related video.

Junior Dispatch invites you to participate by commenting or e-mailing juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com with your thoughts on the chapter, vocabulary and essay responses or artwork.

By submitting a response, you earn a JD water bottle!

Learn more about the “Little White Fox” reading project here.

So Little White Fox went scratching away over the tundra and hillsides to see what he could find. He was half way up the side of Cape Prince of Wales Mountain when he came on the tracks of a stranger. “He must have come down from the higher mountains,” said Little White Fox to himself.

“I wonder who he is. I don’t believe he is any bigger than I am, for his tracks are very close together.”

He followed the tracks, very curious to know who this newcomer might be.

Pretty soon he came to a tunnel right into the snow. There were several tracks in and out of this, so he could not tell whether the stranger were at home or not. Little White Fox knew now that the other fellow was not so large as he, for the tunnel was almost too small for him to enter. But he gathered his coat close around him and crowded in. He rather hoped that he would not find the stranger at home, but that the table would be set for dinner.

And that was just the way it was! Little White Fox knocked at the door, and when no one answered, he walked right in. No, — the table wasn’t set, but in the storeroom there was plenty of food. Little White Fox did not make the least fuss but set the table himself.

Now you might think that Little White Fox would eat only fresh eggs and fish, but if you think so you are mistaken. He likes berries and roots, and that is just what he had to eat that day,– blueberries from the hillsides and nice juicy roots and bulbs from the tundra! My, they tasted good!

He had just finished eating when something disturbed him. He had been listening to the noise the wind made blowing across the entrance to the tunnel. Now the wind didn’t make any more noise, — not so he could hear it, anyway. That meant that some one had entered the tunnel.

Now Little White Fox was not wishing to see any one just then. “Guess I’d better find the other door to this house and go home,” he said to himself. But there wasn’t any other door. Little White Fox wasn’t afraid, but then, — he just humped himself all up in a corner and wished he didn’t have to meet the stranger, that was all.

Lemmings are small hamster-like mammals that live in the arctic.

Well, sir! he had to laugh when he saw the stranger come in at the door. He was the oddest little fellow you ever saw! He looked just like Thunder, the big white rabbit, only his ears were short, his coat was yellow, and he was ever so much smaller. Little White Fox knew who he was right away, for he had heard his mother speak of the Lemming family. And this was one of the Lemmings! There could be no doubt of it. And the Lemmings are great fighters, if they happen to be in the mood for it. Why, they have been known to jump right into the ocean and try to swim across it.

“Now I wonder what I’d better do,” thought Little White Fox to himself. But just because he couldn’t think of anything at all to do, he did nothing. And that was the very wisest way to behave just then. All bunched up the way he was, he looked very large and strong. The longer Mr. Lemming looked at him, the more sure he became that Little White Fox was some relation of his. And we must be very kind to all our relatives, especially when they are bigger than we are!

Mr. Lemming moved over to one side of the room as if to say, “You may go out if you like.”

Little White Fox moved half way to the door and then stopped, which meant, “I’d like you to move a little farther away.”

Mr. Lemming went back to the other side.

Little White Fox went to the door, but even then he did not go out, not right away, he didn’t. He turned and looked at Mr. Lemming, which meant,”You won’t bite my heels, will you?”

Mr. Lemming didn’t make a move.

Little White Fox put his head out of the door. Then you should have seen him get out of that tunnel! I don’t believe Little White Fox ever went faster in the world. When he was out on the snow, he looked around and felt foolish, for Mr. Lemming was not coming after him at all.

That night Mr. Lemming closed up the tunnel to his house and made a new one under a rock, where he thought Little White Fox would not be able to find it.

Of course Little White Fox should have waited until Mr. Lemming came home, and then asked him for something to eat. But, you know, he was very hungry, and besides he was only a little white fox, after all.

VOCABULARY

Look up and define these words:

  • Lemming –
  • Newcomer –
  • Fuss –
  • Bulb –

YOUR REACTIONS TO THE CHAPTER

In this story, Little White Fox ventures into someone’s home without being invited. Write a story about what you would do if you found a hungry little fox chowing down in your kitchen.  When you’re done  e-mail it to us at juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com or mail it to us.

You can also draw us a picture of a fox, a lemming or any other arctic creature you would like and send it to us.

Our address is: Junior Dispatch, 205 North George St., York, Pa. 17401

COLORING PAGE

Here’s a collection of coloring pages for lemmings at Printable Colouring Pages.

YOUR VIDEO FOR TODAY

Learn a little bit about Alaska and lemmings in this video: http://youtu.be/MOl3MI3UnCE

Lemmings are particularly famous for a 1950s documentary where a whole community of them apparently jumped off a cliff to their watery deaths. However, it was later learned that the lemmings were actually thrown into the water by the photographers of the movie. According to the report below, documentary producers frequently make up dramatic situations for their films: http://youtu.be/j06RwPEOWgQ (Embedding not allowed for this video, so you’ll have to click the link.)

 

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Little White Fox Meets Barred Seal


CHAPTER 5

Little White Fox was running all over the ice that covered the ocean. It was spring, and the sun was shining its best all the time, but there was plenty of ice left. When there is two miles of ice out on the sand bar, and it is all six feet thick, you may easily guess it takes the sun a long time to loosen it up.

LITTLE WHITE FOX AND HIS ARCTIC FRIENDS

EDITOR’S NOTE

Welcome to the Junior Dispatch’s serialization of the 1916 book “Little White Fox and his Arctic Friends” by Roy J. Snell. This version includes all of the original illustrations as well as additional images from around the Internet.

At the end of this chapter is a vocabulary list, an essay question and a related video.

Junior Dispatch invites you to participate by commenting or e-mailing juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com with your thoughts on the chapter, vocabulary and essay responses or artwork.

By submitting a response, you earn a JD water bottle!

Learn more about the “Little White Fox” reading project here.

Well, Little White Fox was skipping about here and there to see what he could see, and was not paying much attention where he was going when, Ah-ne-ca! down he went! Down! Down! and splash! right into the icy water! My! he was frightened! How was he ever to get out of that place? Six feet of ice wall, straight as the sides of a house, was all about him. But what was this he saw on one side. It seemed to be a sort of little shelf. And, yes sir! as Little White Fox swam over to that side and began to climb up, his feet caught on a ledge, and before he knew it he was sitting in as neat a little room as you ever saw, and all made out of ice! — walls, floor, and ceiling!

“Now I wonder who lives here,” said Little White Fox to himself. “Whoever it is, I suppose I shall have a great quarrel with him when he comes home.”

But no one came, and very soon his coat was quite dry and he found himself very comfortable in this strange little ice palace. But how was he ever to get out and go back to his mother and friends?

Just when he was thinking about that, he saw the water get black all at once, and in another moment he was looking right into the face of a stranger who had popped up out of the water, as if by magic.

“Who are you?” asked Little White Fox, shaking all over with fright.

“I have many names.” The stranger grinned so broadly Little White Fox quite lost his fear at once. “Some call me Barred Seal,” the stranger continued, “and some call me Ring Seal. Others call me Rainbow Seal, and still others call me Northern Lights. You may call me what you like. But say, there’s room for us both up there, isn’t there? I am tired!”

“But,” said Little White Fox, when they were both comfortably seated, “you look very much like Little Brown Seal.”

“Yes,” said the other, “he is my cousin, so is Spotted Seal and Oogrook, the big seal, and Little Light Brown Seal, and goodness knows how many more! We are a large family. I am told that we have cousins living down in the Aleutian Islands who are very aristocratic indeed. They go by the name of Hair Seal. Why, their coats, I am told, are so valuable that Omnok, the hunter, would risk his life to get one of them! For my part, I prefer this simple coat which no man would steal, unless he needed it to make a pair of boots. But you must be hungry, and so am I. Just wait a minute.”

"Now," he said, when he had finished fishing, "we will have dinner."

Master Barred Seal disappeared in the water, reappearing from time to time with a fish in his mouth.

“Now,” he said, when he had finished fishing, “we will have dinner.” Before Little White Fox was spread the most tempting array of fish he had ever seen.

“This is the finest home in the world,” said Barred Seal proudly. “Your dinner comes right to your front door. Look!”

Little White Fox looked, and sure enough, there in the water were plenty more fish swimming round and round.

“But what if Omnok, the hunter, should find us here?” Little White Fox shivered suddenly.

“What if he should?” repeated the other. “There are four feet of solid ice between us and the top. He will not come down in the water to get us, so what could he do?”

“But very soon, Mother tells me,” said Little White Fox, “the ice will all melt, or the wind will blow it out to sea.”

“Oh, well, in that case,” replied Barred Seal, smiling, “there is still the wild, free ocean to live in as always.”

“Not for me!” said Little White Fox, turning white in the face and losing his appetite all at once. “How can I get out of here?”

“You don’t want to go so soon,” answered Barred Seal. “Stay with me awhile. I rather like you. And, as you see, we have plenty of good fish to eat.”

“I thank you,” said Little White Fox very politely, “but I’d very much rather go back home.” And at that moment he had a frightful vision of all that ice going out, out to sea.

“Very well,” said Barred Seal, “I’ll go in the water and stand on my tail; then you can climb out on my back. Only don’t dig in your toe nails.”

In another moment Little White Fox was out in the bright sunshine, and you may be very sure he was glad to be there. “I guess the world was made about right,” he said to himself. “And I am glad the hills, the tundra, and my own little home are just as they are, and I am glad I am Little White Fox.”

VOCABULARY

Look up and define these words:

  • Stranger –
  • Array –
  • Ledge –
  • Comfortable –

YOUR REACTIONS TO THE CHAPTER

In this story, Little White Fox is in a very dangerous situation — he’s out walking on ice-covered body of water. This is something you should never do when you are outside. Don’t walk on frozen creeks, frozen lakes or frozen rivers, you could fall in and die from drowning or from being exposed to the cold water. Make a poster that warns other kids to “Stay off the ice!” (or something like that) and then e-mail it to us at juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com or mail it to us. We will post up all the drawings you send us.

Our address is: Junior Dispatch, 205 North George St., York, Pa. 17401

YOUR VIDEO FOR TODAY

Little White Fox just met a “barred seal” which is now more commonly called a ring seal.  http://youtu.be/n5LLmKt2azQ

What’s it like to swim with a seal? Here a diver gets a chance to hang out with a gray seal. Be sure to watch the credits!
http://youtu.be/hGKOOndggxI

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When Little Foxes Quarrel


CHAPTER 4

There apparently were more little Foxes together on the tundra that afternoon than there ever had been before. Little White Fox had just come around a bunch of muckluck grass and spied them, all very much interested in something they had found.

LITTLE WHITE FOX AND HIS ARCTIC FRIENDS

EDITOR’S NOTE

Welcome to the Junior Dispatch’s serialization of the 1916 book “Little White Fox and his Arctic Friends” by Roy J. Snell. This version includes all of the original illustrations as well as additional images from around the Internet.

At the end of this chapter is a vocabulary list, an essay question and a related video.

Junior Dispatch invites you to participate by commenting or e-mailing juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com with your thoughts on the chapter, vocabulary and essay responses or artwork.

By submitting a response, you earn a JD water bottle!

For more on the “Little White Fox” reading project, go here.

“Ha! Ha!” chuckled Little White Fox to himself. “They’ll get their heads pecked good and hard pretty soon!” For those little Foxes there on the tundra had found some of those same round objects that Little White Fox had thought were stones and later learned were eggs. The only difference was that these were much larger and were out on the tundra near one of the salt ponds.

The young Foxes had been playing happily together when they found the eggs. There were the Silver Fox twins, the Black Fox triplets, Reynard Red Fox, Violet Blue Fox, and Baby Cross Fox. Rather a large gathering of Foxes, I admit, but there are more of the Fox family in Alaska than in any other part of the world.

Little White Fox slipped behind the muckluck grass and listened. His relatives were quarrelling over who should have the extra egg. You see here were eight little Foxes and nine eggs, so the question was who should take the extra egg?

“We should have the egg,” said the Silver Fox twins boastfully, “because we belong to the most aristocratic branch of the family. Our mother’s coat alone is worth three hundred dollars.”

“You have no more right to hold up your heads than we have,” one of the Black Fox triplets answered him. “Our mother’s coat is worth quite as much as any Silver Fox’s that ever lived.”

“Fie! Fie! you are both wrong,” reproved Reynard Red Fox. “The best known should always be considered first. Now my father is known all over the world. Whole books have been written about our family.”

“I should have it, because I am a baby,” wailed Baby Cross Fox.

“I’d like to see any of you get it,” cried Violet Blue Fox, seizing the egg and attempting to carry it away. But the greedy miss, while trying to carry it, let go of the one she already had, so she was not a whit ahead.

The fact of the matter was that one of those eggs was all any little Fox could carry, and it certainly was all he could possibly eat. But of course not one of them had thought about that.

This arctic blue fox was photographed by Greg Downing. Visit his photography website at www.gdphotography.com, which includes a gallery of Alaskan animals.

Now Little White Fox had lain hid behind the muckluck grass nearly splitting himself with laughter at the thought of the whacking their heads were going to get after awhile. But when he had waited a long time and no one had come to molest his cousins, he began to want one of those eggs for himself. It happened that this was the nest of Old Mrs. Long Neck, the widgeon duck. And Omnok, the hunter, had captured her two days before, so she would never come back to protect her eggs.

Little White Fox stood it as long as he could, and then he came marching boldly out from his hiding place.

“If you don’t mind,” he said very importantly, “I’ll take the extra egg, and that will settle the difficulty.”

But that only started the discussion going faster than ever. “You didn’t!” “I did!” “You can’t!” “I can!” “I will!” “You won’t!” and so on and so on they went. Probably they would be quarrelling yet, if Little White Fox had not caught sight of a very tall person coming through the muckluck grass. It was the dreadful Omnok, the hunter!

“Look out!” he cried.

But he was too late. Bang! went the hunter’s terrible gun, and a hot bullet whizzed by his ear. The Foxes scattered in every direction, Little White Fox making for his home as fast as his legs would carry him. And his heart beat so fast that even when he had been for half an hour safe under the big flat rock, his breath still came pantingly.

Ah-ne-ca!” cried Omnok, out on the tundra. “What did I shoot at them for? Their coats are not worth a penny till old winter gets at them and makes them thick and strong. My, but they were a fine bunch! If I can catch half of them next winter, I can buy a whole herd of reindeer and become a reindeer man. But what have we here? Ho-ho! So this is what they were making such a fuss about! Old Long Neck’s nest! Well, I guess nine good eggs will be fine eating for my wife and the children.”

With that Omnok put the eggs in his hunting sack and went stalking away.

VOCABULARY

Look up and define these words:

  • Quarrel—
  • Aristocrat –
  • Whit –
  • Reprove –

YOUR REACTIONS TO THE CHAPTER

In this story, we learn about some different kinds of foxes, who Little White Fox calls his cousins. Tell us about your cousins and other relatives? Where do they live? What do they like to do? Tell us about it in the comments below or e-mail your story to juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com.

YOUR VIDEO FOR TODAY

This chapter of “Little White Fox” shows us some different kinds of foxes. Learn more about the one member of that fox family in this video, just the first of dozens of videos on this particular fox. http://youtu.be/s2AkU2llon0

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Little White Fox Makes a Discovery

Editor’s note: Welcome to the Junior Dispatch’s serialization of the 1916 book “Little White Fox and his Arctic Friends” by Roy J. Snell. This version includes all of the original illustrations as well as additional images from around the Internet.

At the end of each chapter is a vocabulary list, an essay question and a related video, usually of a arctic animal doing the kind of things arctic animals do.

Junior Dispatch invites you to participate by commenting or e-mailing juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com with your thoughts on the chapter, vocabulary and essay responses or artwork. If you submit a response, you will earn a JD water bottle!

For more on the Little White Fox reading project, go here!

LITTLE WHITE FOX AND HIS ARCTIC FRIENDS

CHAPTER I

Little White Fox was very, very much worried, for something dreadful had happened, something he couldn’t account for at all: Tdariuk, the reindeer, was dead!

Tdariuk was not related to Little White Fox. And he wasn’t a bit in the world like him. He was many times bigger than Little White Fox would ever be, and he was quite different from him in every way. But all the same, Little White Fox loved him. If you had asked him why he loved the big reindeer, he would probably have told you that, for one thing, Tdariuk, in spite of his huge body, was very gentle and kind. None of the little animals of the tundra was afraid of him. Little Mrs. Ptarmigan calmly hunted for dry blueberries and weed seed right beside him while he cropped his moss. And when he drew close to the shore by the sea, Little Brown Seal never thought of such a thing as slipping off his rock and hiding in the water. Even if there were no other reason, wouldn’t Tdariuk’s gentleness alone make Little White Fox love him?

Reindeer are much bigger than the whitetail deer seen in America.

Now when Little White Fox discovered that his big, kind friend was dead, he ran home as fast as his legs could carry him to tell his mother the sad news.

“Mother! Mother!” he called tumbling into his home under the great rock, “Tdariuk is dead!”

“Tdariuk dead!” cried Madam White Fox. “Who could have been mean enough to kill him?”

“I don’t know who killed him, but he’s dead, I know that,” said Little White Fox, the tears running down his cheeks.

“It must have been Old Man Gray Wolf, or Omnok, the hunter,” said Madam White Fox, wiping her eyes with her paw. “For my part, I could easily wish them both dead themselves. None of us is safe as long as they are about. But who told you Tdariuk was dead?”

“No one told me. I found it out for myself,” boasted Little White Fox proudly, quite forgetting his sorrow in thinking what a wise young chap he was.

Youfound it out!” exclaimed his mother. “Pray, tell me how?”

The arctic fox is specially adapted for life in the cold.

“Why, you see,” explained Little White Fox, with an air of deep mystery, “I was down on the tundra, at the foot of Saw Tooth Mountain, looking all around to see what I could see. And all of a sudden I came right on one of Tdariuk’s great, fine antlers lying there in the snow. Now, what do you think of that? And when I went on a little farther, there was the other one! And then I knew, of course, that Tdariuk was dead.”

When Madam White Fox heard that, she smiled a little and stopped wiping her eyes. But all she said was: “Keep your eyes wide open, my son, and one of these days you will see something very strange.”

Little White Fox thought that a queer way to answer him. Why, she hadn’t even told him he was smart to discover about Tdariuk.

“What do you mean, mother? What will I see? Tell me what I will see! Please tell me what I will see!” teased Little White Fox.

But not another word would Madam Fox tell him. Little White Fox wondered why she dried her tears for Tdariuk so quickly, but he couldn’t find that out, either.

And so every day and all day, Little White Fox went peering curiously about everywhere, just as his mother had told him to do, trying to find the something that was “very strange.” He looked all around among the sand dunes by the ocean, but there was nothing strange there. He went in and out among the big rocks at the foot of Saw Tooth Mountain and came near falling into one of Omnok’s cruel traps, but there was nothing strange there. He went here and there, and back and forth, all over the tundra, but there was nothing strange there.

Hunt as he would, Little White Fox could find nothing strange anywhere. He had grown quite discouraged, when one day, when he was searching down among the scrub willows by the river, his ear caught a familiar sound, “Ark! Ark! Ark!”

Little White Fox couldn’t believe his ears.

“Why, that’s queer!” he exclaimed. “It sounds just like Tdariuk, the reindeer. But it can’t be Tdariuk. How could it be Tdariuk, when Tdariuk’s dead?”

Then he heard it again, much louder this time and quite close: “Ark! Ark! Ark!”

Little White Fox, for once in his life, was too astonished to say a word. He just held his breath and waited. And in just another moment out walked Tdariuk, as big and gentle as ever, and very much alive indeed. And — on his head he wore a brand new pair of antlers, bigger than the others and all covered with velvet! My! how handsome those antlers were!

Little White Fox didn’t stop to ask a single question. He just gave Tdariuk one long look and then whirled around and ran home as fast as he could travel.

He burst breathlessly into the cave and started to tell his mother that Tdariuk wasn’t dead. But it wasn’t news to her; she had known it all the time. Little White Fox, however, had found out the something very strange that she had hoped he would find, and had done it all by himself. Therefore Madam Fox was very happy as she curled down on the floor for her afternoon nap.

VOCABULARY

Look up and define these words:

  • Moss —
  • Madam –
  • Tundra –
  • Velvet –

YOUR REACTIONS TO THE CHAPTER

In this story, readers learn about how animals can change their appearance. Aside from reindeer, what animals do you know of that alter their appearance? Think of animals like butterflies and frogs or even animals that shed their thick coats from winter into spring. Tell us a story of how you can change your appearance with new clothes, haircuts or a costume.

VIDEO

Get some quick facts on arctic foxes.  http://youtu.be/dGwlt3Wm2Fg

Here’s a close up look at our star, the Little White Fox! http://youtu.be/uSvIE8Fcwdw

 

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Prince Jan: St. Bernard

This post was created to serve as the hub of all things related to our “Prince Jan: St. Bernard” reading project and its additional dog-themed Junior Dispatch items. It was originally presented to Junior Dispatch readers in March 2010. Each chapter features a video, vocabulary words and an essay question.

WHAT’S IT ABOUT?

“Prince Jan: St. Bernard” is a book by Forrestine C. Hooker and tells the story of a young St. Bernard pup that is brought from Europe to America. His life there starts out nice enough, but things soon go bad for him. Find out if he’s able to turn things around in this exciting 17-chapter novel!

This book will be best appreciated by advanced readers, but we hope all will enjoy it!

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PRINCE JAN: ST. BERNARD

DOG TALE: This is the cover of one of the first editions of "Prince Jan," an adventure story about a St. Bernard.

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COLORING PAGES

Here are all of our dog related coloring pages.

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MORE ABOUT DOGS!

The Junior Dispatch publishes a lot of dog related articlesn and videos. Check them out!

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IDITAROD COVERAGE

Follow our Iditarod news here!

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PROJECT GUTENBERG

Get your own free digital copy of  “Prince Jan: St. Bernard” at Project Gutenberg.

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Pet poems from Mount Wolf (Part 3)

Test your artistic skills with some of the Junior Dispatch's animal-themed coloring pages by clicking this logo!

Mrs. Zortman’s second-grade class at Mount Wolf elementary submitted these poems to the Junior Dispatch. This is final set of student submissions from the class!

Parents, teachers, scout masters, youth group leaders and caregivers: You can submit your kid-created items to the Junior Dispatch. Find out how!

From Griffin G.:
A mouse is in my house.
The mouse is small and tall.
He’s squeaky and peeky.
He’s very fast and nice.
His mice eat dice and rice.

From Haley C.:
My dog is fast
And she had to get a cast.
She shines and whines.
She goes to town
And she is brown.
Her name is Fame.

From Jordan B.:
My cat is fat.
My cat is chasing a rat.
My cat is fat and chasing a rat.
My cat is running.
He thinks it’s funny.
My cat is fat like a big fat rat.
My cat is like a rat.
My cat is a brat.
My cat turns into a rat.
And it is black.
My cat is fat like a fat bat.
The cat saw a big fat bat.
The bat went into a hat.
And it was laying that bat in the hat.
That cat saw a big fat rat.

From Jordan T.:
He had a name when he had fame.
When he saw a fish on a dish
And he ate it.
He also ate a rat.
He was almost fat.
Did you guess who it is?
It is a bear.

From Jusmin K.:
My bobcat is fat and it likes to eat a rat.
A bobcat sat on a mat.
And it fell asleep.
When he woke up, he wanted to eat another rat.

From Kaylee S.:
My cat is outside
And he is scratching on the door.
I let him in
And he eats the cat food on the floor.

From Keryn A:
My cat is fat.
She likes to go outside.
She likes to slide on the slide and catch a rat.
And creep back inside.
She comes in my room and she goes on my bed.
And picks up a book that is red.
She goes to sleep.

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Pet poems from Mount Wolf (Part 2)

Mrs. Zortman’s second-grade class at Mount Wolf elementary submitted these poems to the Junior Dispatch. The final set of student submissions from the class will be posted tomorrow!

Test your artistic skills with some of the Junior Dispatch's animal-themed coloring pages by clicking this logo!

Parents, teachers, scout masters, youth group leaders and caregivers: You can submit your kid-created items to the Junior Dispatch. Find out how!

From Tessa F.:
There is a bat in my house.
He’s eating all my food.
He was in a very bad mood.
He turned on the tv and watched bats.
But he screamed because he saw a cat.
And the cat screamed because she saw a dog.
The dog said, “Hey!  I’m not a mad dog.  I just want to play.”

From Abby H:
My dog runs fast
And he had to get a cast.
My dog wants to dye his hair brown
And he wants to live in a town.
He is skinny and he wants to be mini.

From Alex S.:
There is a wolf in my house
And he was walking in my bathroom and had a shower.
Then he ate a lemon that was sour.
We’re out of the house at night
And he is white.

From Christian R.:
My fish is fat
And he swims in a hat.
And he fell upside down.
Then he went downtown.

From Dakota McC.:
My cat is brown as dirt.
And my cat always gets hurt.
My cat likes to wear shirts.
My cat likes to run.
And my cat is fun.

From Dylin S.:
I saw an owl
While I heard a werewolf howl.
The owl heard a cat meow.
By now the owl shall bow.

From Emma S.:
My cat is skinny and brown and she wears a crown.
All day she watches the circus clown
And sometimes slurks downtown.

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