This little cup costs $36M, and it doesn’t even come with a milkshake

The Meiyintang “Chicken Cup” from the Chinese Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) was sold for $36.1 million at a recent auction. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

The Meiyintang “Chicken Cup” from the Chinese Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) was sold for $36.1 million at a recent auction. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

A collector from Shanghai, China, bought a rare Ming Dynasty cup for $36 million at an auction last week.

Yep, you read that right: 36 million bucks for a tiny little cup and it doesn’t even come with a lid and straw.

Even worse, it has chickens on it.

The sale, which was held in Hong Kong, smashed the previous world record price for Chinese porcelain.

The small white cup, which measures just 3.1 Inches in diameter — to small to hold the entire contents of a carton of milk from a school cafeteria — and is more than 500 years old. The vessel is known as a “Chicken Cup” because it’s decorated with a rooster and hen tending to their chicks.

The Chicken Cup was made during the reign of the Ming Dynasty’s Chenghua Emperor, who ruled from 1465 to 1487. Sotheby’s, the auction house where it was sold, said there are only 17 such cups in existence, with four in private hands and the rest in museums.

“There’s no more legendary object in the history of Chinese porcelain,” said Nicholas Chow, Sotheby’s deputy chairman for Asia. “This is really the holy grail when it comes to Chinese art.”

Sotheby’s said the previous record for Chinese porcelain was set in 2010 when a gourd-shaped Qianlong vase sold for $32.4 million.

Liu Yiqian, the winning bidder, is a middle-school dropout who drove a cab before becoming a multimillionaire. Forbes estimates his fortune at $900 million, making him the 200th richest person in China.


Reported by KELVIN CHAN of the Associated Press from HONG KONG.

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U.S. creates library of dirt

A student at North Carolina State University collects soil in Southern California. The federal government sent students and scientists to more than 4,800 places across the nation to collect soil that was analyzed for its composition. The results are now highly sought after by researchers in a wide variety of fields. (AP Photo/U.S. Geological Survey)

A student at North Carolina State University collects soil in Southern California. The federal government sent students and scientists to more than 4,800 places across the nation to collect soil that was analyzed for its composition. The results are now highly sought after by researchers in a wide variety of fields. (AP Photo/U.S. Geological Survey)

The government has been collecting dirt — lots of it.

Clumps came from the Texas Panhandle, a shady grove in West Virginia, a picked-over corn field in Kansas and thousands of other places in the lower 48 states.

A small army of researchers and university students lugging pick axes and shovels scattered across the country for three years to scoop samples into plastic bags from nearly 5,000 places. They marked the GPS coordinates, took photos and labeled each bag before mailing them back to the government’s laboratory in Denver.

Though always underfoot and often overlooked, dirt actually has a lot to tell. Scientists say information from it could help farmers grow better vegetables and build a better understanding of climate change.

David Smith, who launched the U.S. Geological Survey project in 2001, said the data available from the samples will feed research for a century, and he’s sharing it with anyone who wants it. “The more eyes and brains that look at it, the better,” Smith said.

Old info: The idea for the massive research project came in the late 1990s, when Smith was in charge of handing out the government’s store of soil data — what little there was. The old archive held information collected in the 1960s and 1970s, and based on outdated science. Just about every researcher returned with the same disappointment, saying: “There must be more.”

Smith told them that, sadly, no, there wasn’t.

So he took action. During the next several years, Smith and his fellow geologists refined a plan for collecting and documenting the makeup of the nation’s soil.

Digging started in 2007 and wasn’t done until 2010. They strategically sunk their shovels at a spot in every 600 square miles in the continental United States. At each locale they took three samples. They had rules to follow as well — they had to start at the surface and going no deeper than three feet.

Reactions: Before retiring, U.S. Geological Survey geologist Jim Kilburn trained many of the 40 surveyors and went into the field himself several times for up to a month. He sent back hundreds of samples on the road from Nebraska down to Texas and from Kansas west to the California coast.

Only once was Kilburn told to go away. A rancher near Sacramento, Calif., had let government researchers onto his pastures before, where they found a rare clover and told him he could no longer graze cattle there.

“No matter what I told the guy, he wasn’t going to let me on,” Kilburn said. “He had good reason.”

_____

Contact David Smith of the U.S. Geological Survey at dsmith@usgs.gov, or access his soil survey at http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/801/.

Reported by SCOTT SMITH of the Associated Press from FRESNO, Calif

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Musher drops out of Iditarod as questions about dogs’ diet linger

 Nicolas Petit, from Girdwood, Alaska, changes the plastic on his runners at the Cripple checkpoint in Cripple, Alaska,  during the 2014 Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race . (AP Photo/The Anchorage Daily News, Bob Hallinen)

Nicolas Petit, from Girdwood, Alaska, changes the plastic on his runners at the Cripple checkpoint in Cripple, Alaska, during the 2014 Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race . (AP Photo/The Anchorage Daily News, Bob Hallinen)

About 11 miles before reaching this Bering Sea community, snowmachiner Dave Branholm was curious to find a team stopped along the Iditarod Trail, so he pulled over his snowmachine to check things out.

About 30 minutes earlier, Nicolas Petit, the driver of the team and a top contender in this year’s Iditarod, had pressed his emergency locator button to officially withdraw himself from the race.

jd-iditarod-logoBranholm asked Petit what happened — a question asked by race followers ever since the Girdwood musher scratched at 6:45 p.m. Saturday.

“He was so tired, he wasn’t thinking straight is what happened,” said Branholm, a three-time Iditarod finisher. “The dogs looked fine.”

A sixth-place finisher last year, Petit was putting together another solid race. At one point along the 80-mile stretch from Kaltag to Unalakleet, he was in third place behind Aliy Zirkle and Martin Buser.

Branholm said he passed beds of straw that a musher had laid down for dogs to rest, and then about eight miles later encountered Petit’s team, stopped and unwilling to go any farther. Branholm speculated that Petit may have roused his dogs too soon after bedding them down.

Petit, a 34-year-old carpenter, was in Unalakleet on Sunday waiting for a flight to Anchorage. He said Iditarod race marshal Mark Nordman told him he is not allowed to speak to the media.

All Petit was willing to say was that his dogs were dealing with a “dietary issue,” and that’s why he scratched. He said he heard mumblings in Unalakleet that something was wrong with him, but at the airport he said he fed his dogs a new kind of food on the trail and some of them had “issues” with it.

“The dogs looked great, but if the musher thinks there’s an issue, people should respect that,” Petit said. “I don’t have kids. They (the dogs) are my kids.”

Petit ended the interview there.

After leaving Nulato early Saturday morning after resting for 3.5 hours, Petit blew through the next checkpoint in Kaltag. A move like that usually includes a stop at the Tripod Flats or Old Woman along the way, but according to Petit’s GPS tracker, he appeared to be go to Unalakleet without stopping.

Lance Mackey made the Nulato-to-Unalakleet run famous in 2010. His dogs ran the 120 miles nonstop in 18 hours, which catapulted the Fairbanks musher from third to first and resulted in his fourth Iditarod championship.

Branholm said that when he encountered Petit, the musher asked him to stay with him until assistance arrived.

“I just felt so bad for him,” Branholm said. “The guy’s about ready to cry. You darn-near want to cry with him. It’s just a shame.”

“Nick has come a long way,” he added. “Gosh, if I could’ve got there a little bit earlier, I could have kept him from pushing that button.”

A volunteer eventually arrived on a snowmachine and transported Petit to Unalakleet along with his dogs.

___
Reported by CASEY GROVE of the Anchorage Daily News from UNALAKLEET, Alaska. Daily News correspondent Kevin Klott contributed to this story.
(MCT)
(c)2014 the Anchorage Daily News (Anchorage, Alaska)
Visit the Anchorage Daily News (Anchorage, Alaska) at www.adn.com
Distributed by MCT Information Services

MORE IDITAROD ACTION

Junior Dispatch’s coverage of the 2014 Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race:

 

Junior Dispatch also offered a series of “Fast-Facts” to help familiarize readers with the rules of the game:

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Southern York County School District teachers win award

Ashley Rushatz, Southern Elementary School Art teacher, is shown with third grade students, Cooper Davis, left, and Evan Martin, right. She was named an Outstanding Teacher by the Shippensburg University School Study Council.

Ashley Rushutz w students

Below, Kellin McCullough, Susquehannock High School Business Education teacher, is shown assisting Makenzie Fancher, left, and Mike Spadafore, right, students in her Entrepreneurship class. She was also named an Outstanding Teacher by the Shippensburg University School Study Council.

Kellin with students cropped

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‘Tales of Buried Treasure’ contest: First Place Winners

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This is it! We’re ready to announce the big winners of the “Tales of Buried Treasure.” These champions and the second and third place winners will be awarded their prizes at a special ceremony at the York Emporium on Friday, Oct. 4.

We will be contacting all the winners shortly, so keep an eye out in your e-mail in boxes and your regular mail.

After weeks of reading and evaluating the crack team of Junior Dispatch literary judges have made jd-sitenewstheir selections on the best stories submitted in our “Tales of Buried Treasure” short story contest, which Junior Dispatch offered with the help of the York Emporium and the York County Libraries.

We received more than 100 entries and now we are announcing the third place winners in each of our age categories. Second and third place winners will be announced Wednesday and Thursday.

12 to 18 AGE GROUP

Awarded to Tristan Albert, 16, of Hanover for the story titled “The Treasure of the Upson.” Read the story here about a treasure no one is meant to find.

8 to 11 AGE GROUP

Awarded to Amanda Cox, 11, of Red Lion for the story titled Death Gaze’s Hoard.” Read the story here about a young dragon named FlashBolt.

7 and YOUNGER AGE GROUP

Awarded to Eliana Whing, 7, for the story titled “A Family Treasure Hunt.” Read the story here about kids seeking out a leprechaun’s hidden riches.

As first-prize winners, these amazing writers earn a $50 movie gift card and a $50 gift certificate from the York Emporium.

 

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Poetry from students at Fishing Creek Elementary School

CATS

By Ben Barone

Cats are soft

Cute, cute, cute

Cats are small

Cute, cute, cute

Cats are friendly

Cute, cute, cute

 

BOOKS

By Ella Beam

Books

Funny, funny, funny

Books

Learning, learning, learning

Books

Great, great, great

 

FOOD

By Zachary Benson

Pizza

Food, food, food

Ice cream

Food, food, food

Bananas

Food, food, food

 

PRESENTS

By Autumn Broker

Christmas

Presents, presents, presents

Birthday

Presents, presents, presents

Christmas Eve

Presents, presents, presents

 

BASEBALL

By Nicky Buchanan

Batting and fielding

Fun, fun, fun

Catching and pitching

Fun, fun, fun

Coaches are nice

Fun, fun, fun

 

DESSERTS 

By Abby Burkholder

Cake

Yum, yum, yum

Cookies

Yum, yum, yum

Wafers

Yum, yum, yum

Swiss cakes

Yum, yum, yum

 

DOGS

By Amber Cleland

Play a lot

Eating, eating, eating

Dripping water

On the floor, on the floor, on the floor

Running with friends

Happy, happy, happy

 

DOGS

By Amysia Dodson

Chew

Bark, bark, bark

Growl

Bark, bark, bark

Run

Bark, bark, bark

 

SWIMMING

By Miranda Glover

Stroking

Swimming, swimming, swimming

Kicking

Swimming, swimming, swimming

Pogoing

Swimming, swimming, swimming

 

1D

By Cassidy Hackenberger

Harry

One D, One D, One D

Nial

One D, One D, One D

Liam

One D, One D, One D

 

SPORTS

By Andrew Hawkins

Football

Sports, sports, sports

Basketball

Sports, sports, sports

Baseball

Sports, sports, sports

 

BASEBALL 

By Tanner Herman

Baseball

Hit, hit, hit

Batting

Hit, hit, hit

Bunting

Hit, hit, hit

 

NIC

By Nic Kauffman

Awesome

Nic, Nic, Nic

Epic

Nic, Nic, Nic

Athletic

Nic, Nic, Nic

 

FOOTBALL

By Skyler Latchford 

Tackling

Football, football, football

Running

Football, football, football

Six Inches

Football, football, football

 

ANIMALS 

By Madison Marks

Dogs

Animals, animals, animals

Cats

Animals, animals, animals

Hamster

Animals, animals, animals

 

T-DEVELS

By Kajal Mehta

Misunderstood

T-Devels, T-Devels, T-Devels

Nice

T-Devels, T-Devels, T-Devels

Harmless

T-Devels, T-Devels, T-Devels

 

FOOD

By Anna Nguyen

Food

Good, good, good

Food

Smells, smells, smells

Food

Yummy, yummy, yummy

 

COTTON

By Taylor Reed

Cotton, cotton, cotton

I want to sleep on cotton

Cotton, cotton, cotton

Make cotton people

Cotton, cotton, cotton

Get some cotton

 

KITTENS

By Sydney Renzo

Kittens

Playing all day

Later

Sleeping all day

Morning

Playing all day

 

MATH

By Max Saltzer

Addition

Math, math, math

Subtraction

Math, math, math

Multiplication

Math, math, math

 

SOFTBALL

By Brenna Silvio

Softball, softball, softball

Super fun

Softball, softball, softball

Fast pitch is cool

Softball, softball, softball

I love softball

 

FOOTBALL

By Nathan Smith

Football

Football, football, football

Catching

Football, football, football

Running

Football, football, football

 

SUMMER

By Alexis Stakem

Swimming

Summer, summer, summer

Lemonade

Summer, summer, summer

Hot Days

Summer, summer, summer

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‘Tales of Buried Treasure’ contest: Second Place Winners

slider-Treasure_prize_2nd

It seems appropriate we would be announcing another set of winners on Talk Like A Pirate Day, so here goes!

After weeks of reading and evaluating the crack team of Junior Dispatch literary judges have made jd-sitenewstheir selections on the best stories submitted in our “Tales of Buried Treasure” short story contest, which Junior Dispatch offered with the help of the York Emporium and the York County Libraries.

We received more than 100 entries and now we are announcing the third place winners in each of our age categories. First and second place winners will be announced Thursday and Friday.

12 to 18 AGE GROUP

Awarded to Kennedy Bryant, 14, of Spring Grove for the story titled “The Siren’s Slave.” Read the story here about the hunt for a sea creature’s treasure.

8 to 11 AGE GROUP

Awarded to Imani-Unheri White, 8, of Dover for the story titled “The Crystal Chest of the Mystical Island.” Read the story here about a young girl’s quest.

7 and YOUNGER AGE GROUP

Awarded to Alex Fisher, 7, of Windsor for the story titled “Fairytale Treasures.” Read the story here about a boy named Joe Joe on an “adventure walk.”

As second-prize winners, these amazing writers earn a $20 movie gift card and a $20 gift certificate from the York Emporium.

 

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‘Tales of Buried Treasure’ contest: Third Place Winners

slider-Treasure_prize_3rd

After weeks of reading and evaluating the crack team of Junior Dispatch literary judges have made jd-sitenewstheir selections on the best stories submitted in our “Tales of Buried Treasure” short story contest, which Junior Dispatch offered with the help of the York Emporium and the York County Libraries.

We received more than 100 entries and now we are announcing the third place winners in each of our age categories. First and second place winners will be announced Thursday and Friday.

12 to 18 AGE GROUP

Awarded to My-Hoa Do, 12, of New Oxford for the story titled “Message in a Bottle.” Read the story here about a mysterious locked chest.

8 to 11 AGE GROUP

Awarded to Rhiannon Ernst, 11, of Dover for the story titled “Digging Up A Fortune.” Read the story here about a the secrets of Greenmist.

7 and YOUNGER AGE GROUP

Awarded to Charlotte Pinamonti, 5, or Lewisberry for the story titled “Susannah and the Buried Treasure.” Read the story here about a team of treasure hunters, including 2,000 chickens.

As third-prize winners, these amazing writers earn a $10 movie gift card and a $10 gift certificate from the York Emporium.

 

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School makes donation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

childrens

 

Kathleen Tunney, Children’s Home of York’s Director of Development, center, accepts a $235 donation from Leena Patel, The Goddard School owner, left, and Sara Bosley, the school’s education director.

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