The world of ‘Phil Hardy’


Welcome to the “Phil Hardy” homepage here at Junior Dispatch!
This 100-episode comic strip originally ran in newspapers around the world in the 1920s, and with the help of Barnacle Press, the Junior Dispatch now offers it to you — with something extra that readers didn’t have in the twenties.

NEW FOR YOU

Each episode of Phil Hardy includes links to videos and other websites where you can explore the world of the 1920s and how that long-ago decade still influences what we do today.

These links are all entertaining and are 100% kid safe. Even better, they might prove to be edicational.

THE CREATORS AND THEIR PLACE IN HISTORY

The comic strip, which was written by Edwin Alger and drawn by George Storm, also included a history-making moment for comic strips. We’ll let you know about that when it happens in the series.

Both Alger and Storm later worked for DC Comics, as well as several other comic publishers.

INTERACT

We urge you to comment on the entries. You can tell us what you think about the story or the links and videos in each entry.

You can also download and print out each comic and color it. If you do, send us a few pictures of your coloring efforts.

EPISODES 1 through 10

EPISODES 11 through 20

EPISODES 21 through 30

EPISODES 31 through 40

EPISODES 41 through 50

EPISODES 51 through 60

EPISODES 61 through 70

EPISODES 71 through 80

EPISODES 71 through 80

EPISODES 91 through 100

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Episode 100 — The Finale

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Well, this is it Episode 100 is the final edition of the Phil Hardy comic strip, which was written by Edwin Alger and drawn by George Storm. Storm, as you read yesterday, continued working in comic books. Unfortunately, Edwin Alger’s life has been harder to track down.

Since this is the last Phil Hardy comic strip, why not consider making your own comic strip? In the image attached below, George Storm offers young artists a few tips on getting into the cartooning trade. If you want to draw some comic strips, send them to us, and we will post them here.

What’s next for Junior Dispatch’s “Time for Comics?” check back after Thanksgiving week for more details!

Click on the picture for a larger image!

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Episode 99 — Friends Together

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In episode 99, Phil and his friends gather for a meal at the Healy house. But one friend is missing from these panels. If you look back over some previous editions of the Phil Hardy comic strip, you will often see the word “Storm” in one of the panels. This is the signature of artist George Storm. You can learn more about George Storm in this PDF, or visit the Oklahoma Cartoonist Hall of Fame, which is housed inside the Action Figure Museum in Pauls Valley, Oklahoma.

Note: Just one more Phil Hardy comic strip!

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Episode 98 — Being Successful

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In Episode 98, Mr. Dennison sits down with Phil to talk about how he can become a success in the business world. Have you ever tried running your own business? You can without much trouble, and orange and lemon grower Sunkist has all sorts of ideas on just how to do it. They run a special contest each year where kids set up lemonade stands to make money for charities. The best stories of success earn special prizes. You can find more about the annual contest at Sunkist’s Take A Stand site. If you start up a lemonade stand, let us know and we’ll write about it here at Junior Dispatch.

And if you would rather try your hand at running a virtual lemonade stand, play this old-school video game.

Note: There’s just two episodes of Phil Hardy left!

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Episode 96 — Wrapped Around Her Fingers

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In episode 96, Phil continues talking with his beloved mother. As he does so, he’s giving his mom a help with her knitting, which is a way to stitch yarn or other string into a cloth. Its a tricky task, but you can knit something with just a few supplies.  Also watch this video to learn the basics (and there’s a whole series of videos available).

Note: The Phil Hardy strip is almost over. Just four more episodes after this!

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Episode 95 — Thanks to Tim

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In episode 95, Phil rushes up to his mother with his check for $200. This little scene reminds us of one of our favorite moments when we play Monopoly — Getting $200 every time you pass the “Go” space. The Monopoly game, which was first published in 1934, is an American icon and immortalized in the Toy Hall of Fame in Rochester, N.Y. You can read some interesting Monopoly facts here.

In the comments below, tell us what your favorite Monopoly piece is!

Note: We have just five more episodes of Phil Hardy left!

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Episode 94 — Payment Due

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In the 93rd installment of the “Phil Hardy” comic strip, Phil sits with Mr. Dennison to discuss his employment. On Dennison’s desk is a fancy lamp. While its impossible to tell here, the drawing is very likely meant to look like a Tiffany Lamp, the famously beautiful style of lamp that has been in production since the 1800s. You can see a gallery of Tiffanys here. It’s really worth a look, because the lamps were designed to look like spider webs, lotus flowers, dragonflies and a wide variety of other objects.

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Episode 93 — Hooked on Hard Work

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In Episode 93, Phil Hardy returns to his old job with the Seven Seas company and visits his friend Pat. If you look in Pat’s hand in panel one, you’ll see he’s carrying a hook. That hook is called a longshoreman’s hook and is used to make lugging cargo around a little easier. You can learn a little more about working on the waterfront with the Smithsonian Institution’s web exhibit about the industry. It’s actually pretty interesting, and even includes a couple of comics!

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Episode 92 — Mom’s Still Worried

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In Episode 92, Phil and his friends sit down and talk about Phil’s harrowing experience. While they talk, we can’t help but notice the portrait hanging on the wall.  Portraits are usually pictures or paintings that capture a person’s likeness from the head up. In Washington, D.C., a branch of the Smithsonian Institution is exclusively dedicated to such images. You can visit the National Portrait Gallery’s web-only collections here.

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