For Kid Scoop fans: Some amazing snake videos

This week’s Kid Scoop focuses on snakes, and snakes are definitely a topic that people love to explore at YouTube. Now if you get a little queasy when it comes to snakes, don’t click on any of these videos.

This video takes a look at some of the biggest snakes in the world and how difficult it can be to keep them as pets. You’ll also see them as they are fed. Just so you know, the rabbits being used are already dead. http://youtu.be/cOZVL4H2Uqc

In this video, a Burmese python takes on an American alligator. Watch what happens in this amazing video. http://youtu.be/xfYAj1k9uZM

In this National Geographic video, a mongoose battles a cobra. http://youtu.be/vdg9gkmWsEA

This video gives some basic tips on drawing a snake. It’s a long video, but you will get some good results. http://youtu.be/DQTHwmui6QY

If you’re still interested in drawing snakes, check out this video on how to make scales look real. Also applies to people who like to draw dragons! http://youtu.be/kx51VJ2eT68

What is Kid Scoop? It’s a special page that appears every Monday in The York Dispatch and other local newspapers. Aside from its main feature and the Writing Corner, it includes games, puzzles and jokes.

Get your copy of Kid Scoop in today’s edition of The York Dispatch, and be sure to assemble your own Write On! entry and submit it to NIE@ync.com. We’ll run every entry here!

Of course, you can submit those entries, and anything else you want, for publication here on the Junior Dispatch. Send your JD items to juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com. Learn about what you can submit here.

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Kid Scoop focuses on shelter pets

You can help orphaned animals in a number of ways. Getting your parents to adopt them is one way. You can also organize a pet food drive or help out at a local animal shelter. (Photo by CSeeman via Flickr.com)

You can help orphaned animals in a number of ways. Getting your parents to adopt them is one way. You can also organize a pet food drive or help out at a local animal shelter. (Photo by CSeeman via Flickr.com)

Today’s edition of Kid Scoop looks at the many pets stuck in animal shelters across America. Animal shelters are places where dogs, cats and other animals are taken when they are unwanted or need to be taken from their owners.

While animal shelters can be noisy and scary places for animals, they can help those pets connect with new owners who will take care of them. Here are a few great stories of animals that were brought to a shelter and now have a better home.

http://youtu.be/sGJugyDdwR8

This pup is a little fierce at first … but things turn around. http://youtu.be/xhLriN3nBdE

Here’s the story of a sick cat and the people who stood by her through thick and thin. http://youtu.be/w4qqAv1_mF0

What is Kid Scoop? It’s a special page that appears every Monday in The York Dispatch and other local newspapers. Aside from its main feature and the Writing Corner, it includes games, puzzles and jokes.

Get your copy of Kid Scoop in today’s edition of The York Dispatch, and be sure to assemble your own Write On! entry and submit it to NIE@ync.com. We’ll run every entry here!

Of course, you can submit those entries, and anything else you want, for publication here on the Junior Dispatch. Send your JD items to juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com. Learn about what you can submit here.

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Kid Scoop digs up the dirt on gnomes

Garden gnomes are statues people place in their lawns. Usually they wear red hats, but they also seem to like hats with sports logos too. (Photo by Jens-Ulrich Koch/ddp)

Garden gnomes are statues people place in their lawns. Usually they wear red hats, but they also seem to like hats with sports logos too. (Photo by Jens-Ulrich Koch/ddp)

They’ve been sneaking into our lawns for decades now, and at last Kid Scoop is finally reporting on it: We’re talking about the invasion of the gnomes! You’ve seen them — you know, the little guys with the pointy red hats.

Well aside from being lawn ornaments and the subject of a big-budget animated movie, the legend of the gnomes has been around for centuries now. In America, they started to gain popularity after the publication of a wonderful book called “The Secret Book of Gnomes,” which explained who they are and what they’re doing.

One of the most famous images from author Wil Huygen's and illustrator Rien Poortvliet's "The Secret Book of Gnomes" shows two views of a typical gnome.

One of the most famous images from author Wil Huygen’s and illustrator Rien Poortvliet’s “The Secret Book of Gnomes” shows two views of a typical gnome.

After that, they had an animated movie, a cartoon series, and just kept growing more famous.

More recently, gnomes were used in the Harry Potter series, where they were considered to be indestructible pests that were impossible to get rid of — even for wizards.

But before that book, just what were people calling a gnome? The mythological beings are usually described as a very small human-like creature that lives in an underground burrow. Most of the time, gnomes are nice to humans but they can also be troublesome if they’re annoyed by something a human does.

While modern culture suggests that all gnomes wear pointy red hats, traditional gnomes usually wore clothes similar to those worn by humans in the area where they lived.

Want to learn more about gnomes? Try these videos.

Here you can experience a gnome wedding. http://youtu.be/pMdflpRwwgQ

Enjoy some nearby gnomes. http://youtu.be/MGnpBS__sAY

This trailer, for a Finland-produced TV series, shows another gnome trait: Their skill at building machines. http://youtu.be/6zhi_jZSolY

What is Kid Scoop? It’s a special page that appears every Monday in The York Dispatch and other local newspapers. Aside from its main feature and the Writing Corner, it includes games, puzzles and jokes.

Get your copy of Kid Scoop in today’s edition of The York Dispatch, and be sure to assemble your own Write On! entry and submit it to NIE@ync.com. We’ll run every entry here!

Of course, you can submit those entries, and anything else you want, for publication here on the Junior Dispatch. Send your JD items to juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com. Learn about what you can submit here.

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Dive into swamps and wetlands with Kid Scoop

Swamps and othe wetlands help humans in a variety of ways, including working as water filters and absorbing flood waters. (Photo by ChuckyEager via Flickr.com)

Swamps and othe wetlands help humans in a variety of ways, including working as water filters and absorbing flood waters. (Photo by ChuckyEager via Flickr.com)

This week’s Kid Scoop shines the spotlight on two of the most endangered habitats in America: Swamps and wetlands. The problem is that many people want to use those areas to build buildings, roads and parks, but eliminating them often causes more problems than the engineers expected.

Bill Nye the Science Guy explores wetlands and the problems of building on them in this video. http://youtu.be/BeUPbGWg2KU

Wetlands and swamps also contain a lot of different variety in the wildlife that use it as their homes.   Learn about how to keep a crayfish, one of the most common animals in swamps and wetlands, as a pet. http://youtu.be/rUJ18gRTr64

Check out this video featuring the mudskippers of the mangrove swamps. http://youtu.be/RoLPuYAuBmY

What is Kid Scoop? It’s a special page that appears every Monday in The York Dispatch and other local newspapers. Aside from its main feature and the Writing Corner, it includes games, puzzles and jokes.

Get your copy of Kid Scoop in today’s edition of The York Dispatch, and be sure to assemble your own Write On! entry and submit it to NIE@ync.com. We’ll run every entry here!

Of course, you can submit those entries, and anything else you want, for publication here on the Junior Dispatch. Send your JD items to juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com. Learn about what you can submit here.

 

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Kid Scoop roots out the earth movers

Ants are among the most populous creatures on Earth, and their activity profoundly affects the ground we walk on. (Photo by CauchiSavona via Flickr.com)

Ants are among the most populous creatures on Earth, and their activity profoundly affects the ground we walk on. (Photo by CauchiSavona via Flickr.com)

Today’s Kid Scoop entry looks at the creatures around us that serve as earth movers and shapers. These animals often live underground and use their specialized body parts to dig into the soil as they hunt for food and create shelter for themselves.

Lots of animals could be considered earth movers — from the big creatures like elephants to the tiniest ant. Elephants, for example, use their tusks to dig up edibles. Ants make complex colonies under the ground, which unpacks the dirt and allows plants to grow.

People can also be considered earth movers. We dig up the ground for the same reasons animals do — to help us make better homes and to help us make more food. To that end, people have created all sorts of massive machines to do all that hard work for us.

Not all ants work exclusively underground. These ants, commonly known as lemon ants, work with a particular plant to keep the ground clear so that only their plant will grow. So, in a sense, these ants work just like people do — we make a space in the earth for the vegetation we want to grow. http://youtu.be/y0M8QSCjcdM

In this video, the sounds created by desert grass attracts an earth moving mole. http://youtu.be/8NF1129yjwY

Tortoises also do a little earth moving of their own. In this video, a pet tortoise named Claudine digs a burrow for her own protection. http://youtu.be/CIlVhyz8WaA

What is Kid Scoop? It’s a special page that appears every Monday in The York Dispatch and other local newspapers. Aside from its main feature and the Writing Corner, it includes games, puzzles and jokes.

Get your copy of Kid Scoop in today’s edition of The York Dispatch, and be sure to assemble your own Write On! entry and submit it to NIE@ync.com. We’ll run every entry here!

Of course, you can submit those entries, and anything else you want, for publication here on the Junior Dispatch. Send your JD items to juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com. Learn about what you can submit here.

Ant image by CauchiSavona via flickr.com

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Blow your top over volcanoes

Mount Cleveland, a volcano in Alaska, pours out ash during a recent eruption in this photo taken from the International Space Station. (NASA)

Mount Cleveland, a volcano in Alaska, pours out ash during a recent eruption in this photo taken from the International Space Station. (NASA)


Today Kid Scoop turns its attention to volcanic eruptions, one of the most dangerous events the Earth can dish out. Volcanoes are typically found where two tectonic plates slide away from one another, but can also be the result of hot spots underneath a continental plate.

For humans, volcanoes can pose a real danger because the ash exploding from a volcano can make it impossible to breathe. Even worse, volcanoes can spew out red-hot lava that burns everything around it.

Heat from inside the Earth pushes outward causing volcanoes to erupt on the surface.

Heat from inside the Earth pushes outward causing volcanoes to erupt on the surface.


The good news is that volcanic activity in mainland America is relatively rare — although there was one volcanic explosion in Washington state. In May 1980, the volcano called Mount St. Helens exploded and killed 57 people. Unlike the traditional concept of a volcano, Mount St. Helens exploded from its side and only ash and debris flew out, not lava.

Most of the volcanic activity in the U.S. happens in Alaska and Hawaii, with Hawaii having one of the most active volcanoes in the world.

The world looks peaceful from space … but there’s those volcanoes to worry about! http://youtu.be/Be7o6BYVOzA

In the early part of the first century, the volcano at Mount Vesuvius exploded near the Roman city of Pompeii. The citizens of the city were so surprised by the explosion that most were killed instantly and then their bodies were covered by ash. Centuries later, scientists uncovered the site to show the world what happens in a volcanic eruption. http://youtu.be/SDoSWAQXYqk

And now, check out some amazing footage of what it’s like right next to a churning pool of lava. http://youtu.be/DceHEBGVfj4

What is Kid Scoop? It’s a special page that appears every Monday in The York Dispatch and other local newspapers. Aside from its main feature and the Writing Corner, it includes games, puzzles and jokes.

Get your copy of Kid Scoop in today’s edition of The York Dispatch, and be sure to assemble your own Write On! entry and submit it to NIE@ync.com. We’ll run every entry here!

Of course, you can submit those entries, and anything else you want, for publication here on the Junior Dispatch. Send your JD items to juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com. Learn about what you can submit here.

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Get the facts on earthworms

Earthworms are hatched out of tiny cocoons about the size of a grain of rice.  (Image by Gilles San Martin via Flickr.com)

Earthworms are hatched out of tiny cocoons about the size of a grain of rice. (Image by Gilles San Martin via Flickr.com)

Today’s edition of Kid Scoop takes a look at those wriggly creatures that make their homes in your yard and under rocks — earthworms!

Earthworms, as you can tell, have no skeleton — or at least no boney skeleton. Instead they rely on what’s called a hydrostatic skeleton which uses fluid inside their body to help them move.

Scientists say an earthworm can live up to eight years in the wild, although most only live to age two.

Learn some basic facts about the earthworms found in America. http://youtu.be/A0iOx6nSwz0

You can make your own worm farm. They can be used for fishing bait or to create fertilizer for your plants. http://youtu.be/ZN3cACBUWjI

Did you know there used to be a cartoon about an earthworm? Check out Earthworm Jim! http://youtu.be/Grf5nmVpTzA

What is Kid Scoop? It’s a special page that appears every Monday in The York Dispatch and other local newspapers. Aside from its main feature and the Writing Corner, it includes games, puzzles and jokes.

Get your copy of Kid Scoop in today’s edition of The York Dispatch, and be sure to assemble your own Write On! entry and submit it to NIE@ync.com. We’ll run every entry here!

Of course, you can submit those entries, and anything else you want, for publication here on the Junior Dispatch. Send your JD items to juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com. Learn about what you can submit here.

Earthwom image by Gilles San Martin via Flickr.com

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A day to honor veterans

Veterans Day honors the sacrifices our military personnel have made to keep our country safe.

Today Kid Scoop is looking at Veterans Day and how you, as a kid, can help to celebrate it and honor the soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines and other service personnel that have helped to protect our country.

Veterans Day is marked every year on November 11 in honor of the peace treaties signed at the end of World War I. That armistice was signed at 11 a.m., on the eleventh day of the eleventh month of 1918, which is why the number 11 is significant to Veterans Day.

Kid Scoop offers a number of ways you can help mark the day, but you can also simply reach out to your relatives, neighbors and teachers and ask them if they are veterans. If they are, be sure to thank them for their service.

They might want to talk to you about what they have done in the military or they may not, but be sure to thank them for keeping America strong.

Here’s a great video about remembering the role the military has in our history. http://youtu.be/MnvPBYoJ_bY

What it’s like to be a “military kid.” http://youtu.be/HJTqLFLBRjQ

What is Kid Scoop? It’s a special page that appears every Monday in The York Dispatch and other local newspapers. Aside from its main feature and the Writing Corner, it includes games, puzzles and jokes.

Get your copy of Kid Scoop in today’s edition of The York Dispatch, and be sure to assemble your own Write On! entry and submit it to NIE@ync.com. We’ll run every entry here!

Of course, you can submit those entries, and anything else you want, for publication here on the Junior Dispatch. Send your JD items to juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com. Learn about what you can submit here.

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Kid Scoop gets spooky with Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe is a famous writer who died in 1849. He’s featured in today’s Halloween-themed edition of Kid Scoop. He’s credited with creating the detective story, but his most famous work is probably the poem called “The Raven.”

In that poem, a man is pestered by a raven who seems to be something more than it is.

The poem has been read and dramatized by many people over the years, including on an episode of “The Simpsons.” One of the best was done by Vincent Price, a legend in the movie business for his numerous horror films.

Beyond “The Raven,” Poe also wrote the a lot of other spooky tales. The chilling “Tell-Tale Heart” explores the guilt a murderer feels. The spine-tingling “Cask of Amontillado” focuses on a guy who is buried alive. “The Pit and the Pendulum” is an exercise in sheer terror as a man waits to be sliced in two. In all, Poe came up with a lot of scary ideas!

All these great works were written more than 150 years ago, long before Halloween was a common holiday in the United States, yet they’re still considered to be among the best short stories ever written.

You can hear Vincent Price’s version of “The Raven” here. http://youtu.be/zuGZ_wp_i9w

Learn about Poe himself in this mini-biography. http://youtu.be/x-387NMCR6w

OK, enough of the history stuff, here’s a cartoon parody of “The Raven.” This one also features a reading by Vincent Price! http://youtu.be/v57cDPH1108

 

What is Kid Scoop? It’s a special page that appears every Monday in The York Dispatch and other local newspapers. Aside from its main feature and the Writing Corner, it includes games, puzzles and jokes.

Get your copy of Kid Scoop in today’s edition of The York Dispatch, and be sure to assemble your own Write On! entry and submit it to NIE@ync.com. We’ll run every entry here!

Of course, you can submit those entries, and anything else you want, for publication here on the Junior Dispatch. Send your JD items to juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com. Learn about what you can submit here.

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Kid Scoop is ready to play ball

Alexander Cartwright is crediting with authoring the first baseball rulebook. He also worked as a firefighter, which explains the funny hat he’s wearing.

This week’s edition of Kid Scoop focuses on the great game of baseball. Years ago, people said the game was first developed by Abner Doubleday, but it is actually a “folk game” that developed over time until official rules were published around 1845 by Alexander Cartwright. Cartwright even served as the umpire in the first game of baseball played under his set of rules.

The organization that became Major League Baseball was founded in 1869 with the creation of the Cincinnati Red Stockings team.

Baseball was immensely popular through the 1800s and 1900s, and is still called “America’s pastime,” although some people will tell you that designation now really should go to football.

Still thanks to the sport’s popularity there’s been hundreds of tributes made to the game in the form of movies, cartoons, comics, poems, songs and stories.

Here’s a look at the famous “Casey at the Bat” poem. http://youtu.be/O2F0qC1-sa0

Since we’re looking at Disney films, this video has Goofy teaching us how to play baseball. http://youtu.be/2kQ83_4RdkA

In real life, baseball can be a serious game, but who wants to see that? Here are some baseball bloopers! http://youtu.be/6GAaPU-Aztk

What is Kid Scoop? It’s a special page that appears every Monday in The York Dispatch and other local newspapers. Aside from its main feature and the Writing Corner, it includes games, puzzles and jokes.

Get your copy of Kid Scoop in today’s edition of The York Dispatch, and be sure to assemble your own Write On! entry and submit it to NIE@ync.com. We’ll run every entry here!

Of course, you can submit those entries, and anything else you want, for publication here on the Junior Dispatch. Send your JD items to juniordispatch@yorkdispatch.com. Learn about what you can submit here.

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