YCAS to present 3 planetarium shows

jd-healthyhappyIn the early evening sky Jupiter shines brightly in the southwest. Learn how to find the planets and constellations that are visible in York’s April night sky during three shows presented by the York County Astronomical Society on April 13.

“Two Small Pieces of Glass” will be shown at 7 p.m.; “StarWatch” will begin at 7:40 p.m.; and “Space Dreams” will be presented at 8:20 p.m. at the York Learning Center planetarium, 300 E. 6th Ave., North York.

Admission is $4 for adults and $3 for children and seniors. Admission to any second or third show is $1 each.

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Observe Comet PanSTARRS on Saturday

telescope clipartExperienced comet hunters from the York County Astronomical Society are inviting the public to view Comet PanSTARRS, 7:30 to 8 p.m. Saturday at their John C. Rudy County Park observatory.

The comet will emerge from the sun’s glare low in the twilight, but the event will only be held if it is clear or partly cloudy out.

If the weather is questionable, call (717) 578-9109 for notice of any late cancellation. If it is clear or mostly clear, the activity will occur as scheduled. If it is completely cloudy, raining or snowing, the activity will be cancelled.

For directions to the observatory or information about other YCAS events, visit www.ycas.org.

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Three shows in March at York planetarium

telescope clipartThe York County Astronomical Society will present three shows on Friday, March 8, at the York Learning Center planetarium, 300 E. 6th Ave., North York.

7 p.m.: “Max Goes to the Moon” — Max (the dog) and a young girl named Tori take the first trip to the Moon since the Apollo era. Along the way, the story sets the stage for sophisticated science topics — all thoughtfully explained so that grownups and children can learn together.

7:40 p.m.: “StarWatch” — Become a star watcher by exploring the current night sky, locate visible constellations, and enjoy some sky lore. Receive a star map and get answers to commonly asked questions.

8:20 p.m.: “The Planets” — Tour through the solar system and fascinating, recently-discovered sights in this program narrated by Kate Mulgrew of “Star Trek Voyager” fame.

Admission is $4 for adults and $3 for children and seniors. Admission to any second or third show is $1 each.

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Planetarium shows spotlight the solar system

telescope clipartThe York County Astronomical Society will present three planetarium shows on Friday, Jan. 11, at the York Learning Center, 300 E. 6th Ave., North York.

Winter Wonders looks at the time of the winter solstice, the point where the noontime sun is lowest in the sky. Join Jackie and Michelle, two teenage girls, as they hear about the Christian and Jewish religious events during this time of year. In addition, the girls learn about celebrations and rituals of many other cultures that originate from solstice observances. We also look at some of our more light-hearted traditions: gift-giving and decking the halls with candles and greenery. This program includes a look at some of the solstice customs of some of the peoples of central Africa, China, Native Americans, the Inuit, and the Incas to name a few. We conclude by looking at some of the monuments that have been built by prehistoric peoples to the winter solstice. Winter Wonders is a great holiday program for families.

StarWatch allows you to become a star watcher by exploring the current night sky, locating visible constellations, and enjoying some sky lore.

The Planets is a tour through the solar system and fascinating, recently-discovered sights. It is narrated by Kate Mulgrew of “Star Trek Voyager” fame.

Times are 7, 7:40 and 8:20 p.m. Admission is $4 for adults and $3 for children and seniors for one show, and $1 for each additional show.

For more information, visit www.ycas.org.

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Learn how to use your new telescope at free YCAS clinic

The York County Astronomical Society will conduct a New Telescope Clinic, 6-8 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 29, at the John C. Rudy County Park observatory.

Did you get a new telescope recently or discover an unused one in your attic? Experience has shown that the first night out with a new telescope can be daunting as you try to perform all the initial setup work required. Consequently, many new telescopes are used only once or twice, then never again due to frustration.

Bring your telescope and all the items that came with it (including batteries, if required, and the instruction manual). We will check out your telescope, help you align the finder scope, show you how your telescope works, and help you with some initial observations of the sky (clear skies permitting). Afterwards, take home a free Star Chart to help you continue your exploration of the nighttime sky.

This is a FREE clinic and will be offered even if it is cloudy, but will be cancelled if it is snowing. Please dress appropriately for the weather. Call the YCAS hotline at (717) 578–9109 or check http://www.ycas.org for more information.

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Celebrate the winter solstice at public starwatch

The York County Astronomical Society will offer a free public observing starwatch in celebration of the winter solstice, 7-9 p.m. Friday, Dec. 21, at the John C. Rudy County Park observatory.

Expand your mind by taking in the expanse of the universe. Come and view the December skies with us through one of our telescopes and let our experienced members guide you on a tour of celestial wonders, including stars, planets, nebulae, and the moon. You are also invited to bring your own telescope and share your experiences with other amateur astronomers. Star Charts are available to help your exploration of the nighttime sky. This event will only be held if it is clear or partly cloudy out.

For all observing activities at John Rudy Park, if the weather is questionable, please check our voice message at (717) 578-9109 for notice of any late cancellation. If it is clear or mostly clear, the activity will occur as scheduled. If it is completely cloudy, raining or snowing, the activity will be cancelled.

For directions or more information, visit www.ycas.org (the observatory is inside the park, not at the park administrative headquarters).

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December starwatch is Saturday at Rudy Park

The York County Astronomical Society will conduct a free Public Observing Starwatch, 8-10 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 15, at the YCAS observatory, John C. Rudy County Park.

View the January skies through YCAS telescopes and let their experienced members guide you on a tour of celestial wonders, including stars, planets, nebulae, and the moon. Participants may also bring their own telescopes and share experiences with other amateur astronomers. Star charts are available to help with the exploration of the nighttime sky.

The event will only be held if it is clear or partly cloudy out.

For all observing activities at the park, if the weather is questionable, check the YCAS voice message at (717) 578-9109 for notice of any late cancellations. If it is clear or mostly clear, the activity will occur as scheduled. If it is completely cloudy, raining or snowing, the activity will be cancelled.

For directions to the observatory, visit www.ycas.org/directions.htm (the observatory is inside the park, not at the administrative headquarters).

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YCAS to present three planetarium shows on Dec. 14

Learn how to find the planets and constellations visible in York’s December night sky during three shows presented by the York County Astronomical Society, Dec. 14 in the York Learning Center planetarium, 300 E. 6th Ave., North York.

– Max Goes to the Moon (7 p.m.): Max (the dog) and a young girl named Tori take the first trip to the moon since the Apollo era. Along the way, the story sets the stage for the more sophisticated science of the topics: phases of the moon, wings in space and Frisbees and curve balls on the moon — all thoughtfully explained so that grownups and children can learn together about science. Toward the end, Max and Tori’s trip proves so inspiring to people back on Earth that all the nations of the world come together to build a great moon colony from which “the beautiful views of Earth from the moon made everyone realize that we all share a small and precious planet.”

– StarWatch (7:40 p.m.): Become a star watcher by exploring the current night sky, locate visible constellations, and enjoy some sky lore. Receive a star map and get answers to frequently asked questions,

– Winter Wonders (8:20 p.m.): This show looks at the time of the winter solstice, the point where the noontime sun is lowest in the sky. Join Jackie and Michelle, two teenage girls, as they hear about the Christian and Jewish religious events during this time of year. In addition, the girls learn about celebrations and rituals of many other cultures that originate from solstice observances. We also look at some of our more light-hearted traditions: gift-giving and decking the halls with candles and greenery. This program includes a look at some of the solstice customs of some of the peoples of central Africa, China, Native Americans, the Inuit, and the Incas to name a few. It concludes by looking at some of the monuments that have been built by prehistoric peoples to the winter solstice. Winter Wonders is a great holiday program for families.

Admission is $4 for adults and $3 for children and seniors. Admission to any second or third show is $1 each.

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Three shows at North York planetarium

In the early evening sky, Jupiter shines brightly in the East. Learn how to find the planets and
constellations that are visible in York’s November night sky during three shows Nov. 9 at the York Learning Center planetarium, 300 E. 6th Ave., North York. The programs are presented by the York County Astronomical Society.

– Winter Wonders, 7 p.m.: This show looks at the time of the winter solstice, the point where the noontime sun is lowest in the sky. Join Jackie and Michelle, two teenage girls, as they hear about the Christian and Jewish religious events during this time of year. In addition, the girls learn about celebrations and rituals of many other cultures that originate from solstice observances. We also look at some of our more light-hearted traditions: gift-giving and decking the halls with candles and greenery. This program includes a look at some of the solstice customs of some of the peoples of central Africa, China, Native Americans, the Inuit, and the Incas to name a few. We conclude by looking at some of the monuments that have been built by prehistoric peoples to the winter solstice. Winter Wonders is a great holiday program for families.

– StarWatch, 7:40 p.m.: Become a star watcher by exploring the current night sky, locate visible planets and constellations, and enjoy some sky lore.

– New Telescope Clinic, 8:20 p.m.: Are you planning to buy or just considering buying a new astronomical telescope for the holidays – for your family or for yourself? Experience has shown that purchasing the wrong telescope to fit your viewing or budgetary needs can result in frustrations that might result using your new acquisition only once or twice, then never again. To help get you started properly, the York County Astronomical Society is offering a New Telescope Clinic to help you discover what will make a good beginning telescope for you, what additional equipment you will need to maximize your enjoyment, and where and how to shop.

Admission is $4 for adults and $3 for children and seniors. Admission to a second show is $1 each. Admission to the telescope clinic is free with seating on a first come, first seated basis.

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Have an astronomical day at Rudy Park

The York County Astronomical Society will offer a day of activities for children and adults and a night of public observing on Saturday, Oct. 20, at John C. Rudy County Park.

Activities from 1 to 5 p.m. at the Rudy Park observatory are:
– Radio Astronomy – listen to the mysterious sounds of the Universe using a small radio telescope.
– Solar Observing – safely observe the Sun through various types of telescopes.
– Solar System Walk – help us build a scale model of the Solar System.
– Learn how to use your telescope – daytime is the best for learning how to use that telescope gathering dust at home. Bring the telescope, any accessories and instructions to get help from experienced astronomers.
– Catrina Hamilton, Dickinson College professor of physics and astronomy, will present a talk about the discovery of planets around other stars, 2 p.m.

Then, return to the park at 7 p.m. for a three-hour observing session. See all that the October sky has to offer. Bring your own telescope or view through the society’s telescopes.

Both programs are free. The daytime program will be held rain-or-shine. Solar activities will only be offered if it is not cloudy. The evening observing session will only be offered if it is clear or partly cloudy. Call the YCAS Hotline at (717) 578-9109 or check www.ycas.org after 5 p.m. on the day of the event if the weather is questionable.

For more information, visit www.ycas.org.

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